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How to: Designing for Warm Weather

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A layout, strategic window placement, and bright colors can help keep things cool and connected to the outdoors.
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  In architect Benedetta Tagliabue's flat in Barcelona, a lounge area, topped by a barrel ceiling and outfitted with a hammock offers a tantalizingly cozy place to nap. Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.  Photo by: Gunnar KnechtelCourtesy of: Gunnar Knechtel

    In architect Benedetta Tagliabue's flat in Barcelona, a lounge area, topped by a barrel ceiling and outfitted with a hammock offers a tantalizingly cozy place to nap. Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.

    Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel

    Courtesy of: Gunnar Knechtel

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  Architect Gerald Parsonson  designed his New Zealand beach house to best take advantage of the site rather than strictly capitalize on views. The combined open-plan kitchen, living, and dining area opens on to the beach with sliding doors that add ease and ventilation. Photo by Matthew Williams  Photo by: Matthew WilliamsCourtesy of: matthew williams

    Architect Gerald Parsonson  designed his New Zealand beach house to best take advantage of the site rather than strictly capitalize on views. The combined open-plan kitchen, living, and dining area opens on to the beach with sliding doors that add ease and ventilation. Photo by Matthew Williams

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Courtesy of: matthew williams

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  Although columns and pilotis can serve as important structural elements, they aren't always necessary in a design and the uninterrupted view without them is stunning, such as in this home in Maui, Hawaii. Photo by Cristóbal Palma  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

    Although columns and pilotis can serve as important structural elements, they aren't always necessary in a design and the uninterrupted view without them is stunning, such as in this home in Maui, Hawaii. Photo by Cristóbal Palma

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  White plaster and layers of white linens help a house feel cooler in the summer and also imbue the space with a warm weather aesthetic. Click to see more of this Italian home by designer Paola Navone. Photo by Wichmann + Bendtsen.  Photo by: Wichmann + Bendtsen

    White plaster and layers of white linens help a house feel cooler in the summer and also imbue the space with a warm weather aesthetic. Click to see more of this Italian home by designer Paola Navone. Photo by Wichmann + Bendtsen.

    Photo by: Wichmann + Bendtsen

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  Among the first Passive Houses in France, this farmhouse by Karawitz Architecture has stunning bamboo covers on all four sides, its lattice making up a striking set of adjustable screens that allow the residents to modify the facade to suit the weather. The architects tested a host of materials, but bamboo had the aesthetic and green cred they were after. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.  Photo by: Nicholas CalcottCourtesy of: © 2012 Nicholas Calcott

    Among the first Passive Houses in France, this farmhouse by Karawitz Architecture has stunning bamboo covers on all four sides, its lattice making up a striking set of adjustable screens that allow the residents to modify the facade to suit the weather. The architects tested a host of materials, but bamboo had the aesthetic and green cred they were after. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.

    Photo by: Nicholas Calcott

    Courtesy of: © 2012 Nicholas Calcott

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  With the roof angled at 43 degrees, the architects lined the southern slant of the house with solar panels to collect as many rays as possible. Karanesheva and Witzmann started with four, but then added 23 more, all by Systaïc; the company gave them a deal since theirs was its first installation in France. The panels now collect far more energy than the home actually needs, a precious resource that the pair sells back to the power company. systaic.com Photo by Nicholas Calcott

    With the roof angled at 43 degrees, the architects lined the southern slant of the house with solar panels to collect as many rays as possible. Karanesheva and Witzmann started with four, but then added 23 more, all by Systaïc; the company gave them a deal since theirs was its first installation in France. The panels now collect far more energy than the home actually needs, a precious resource that the pair sells back to the power company. systaic.com Photo by Nicholas Calcott

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  In a summer house for a family in Skåne, Sweden, the original washing house that connected to the main house was in such bad shape that it had to be demolished. LASC "reincarnated" it as a spacious bathhouse, complete with a tub‐with-a-­view and a heated concrete window bench. Photo by Laura Stamer.

    In a summer house for a family in Skåne, Sweden, the original washing house that connected to the main house was in such bad shape that it had to be demolished. LASC "reincarnated" it as a spacious bathhouse, complete with a tub‐with-a-­view and a heated concrete window bench. Photo by Laura Stamer.

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  If building a summerhouse or renovating isn't an option (We know, it usually is not), deep blue and green hues, as well as a plethora of houseplants can morph a landlocked living room into a summer retreat. Lucy Feagins of the Design Files designed this home in Sydney, Australia. 

    If building a summerhouse or renovating isn't an option (We know, it usually is not), deep blue and green hues, as well as a plethora of houseplants can morph a landlocked living room into a summer retreat. Lucy Feagins of the Design Files designed this home in Sydney, Australia

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