How to Build A Modern Beach House

written by:
April 15, 2014
Eight modern homes that incorporate sustainable building practices into their oceanfront locations.
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  The locally quarried stone facade of this beachside home in Chile acts as a thermal-mass wall, absorbing heat during the day that is released through the evening. Photo by Cristóbal Palma.  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

    The locally quarried stone facade of this beachside home in Chile acts as a thermal-mass wall, absorbing heat during the day that is released through the evening. Photo by Cristóbal Palma.

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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  A cistern and a composting toilet are some of the green design elements found in this island getaway in Maine. Photo by Eirik Johnson.  Photo by: Eirik Johnson

    A cistern and a composting toilet are some of the green design elements found in this island getaway in Maine. Photo by Eirik Johnson.

    Photo by: Eirik Johnson

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  In New Zealand, a solar-powered home collects and stores rainwater, meeting the needs of its residents while working with the climate and rainfall patterns of the surrounding landscape. Photo by Patrick Reynolds.

    In New Zealand, a solar-powered home collects and stores rainwater, meeting the needs of its residents while working with the climate and rainfall patterns of the surrounding landscape. Photo by Patrick Reynolds.

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  Using a combination of computer technology and onsite observation, the architects who constructed this family home in Tasmania calculated the pitch of the main roof's overhang to let in as much low winter sun as possible, while shielding the interior from the more extreme summer sun. Photo by Peter Hyatt.  Photo by: Peter Hyatt

    Using a combination of computer technology and onsite observation, the architects who constructed this family home in Tasmania calculated the pitch of the main roof's overhang to let in as much low winter sun as possible, while shielding the interior from the more extreme summer sun. Photo by Peter Hyatt.

    Photo by: Peter Hyatt

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  A two-level steel-and-glass tower in Tasmania features a pair of skillion roofs that siphon rain into tanks below the house for daily use. Photo by Peter Hyatt.  Photo by: Peter HyattCourtesy of: 
Peter Hyatt

    A two-level steel-and-glass tower in Tasmania features a pair of skillion roofs that siphon rain into tanks below the house for daily use. Photo by Peter Hyatt.

    Photo by: Peter Hyatt

    Courtesy of: 
Peter Hyatt

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  In Stinson Beach, California, a home threatened by the rising tides features passive heating and cooling. An entry courtyard of drought-resistant plants embraces the flora and fauna of the home's environment. Photo by Mathew Scott.

    In Stinson Beach, California, a home threatened by the rising tides features passive heating and cooling. An entry courtyard of drought-resistant plants embraces the flora and fauna of the home's environment. Photo by Mathew Scott.

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  Wedged into the hillside, a Big Sur, California, home participates in the terrain's unique melding of sea and land. Entering through large, seaward-facing windows, the sun illuminates this home's interior spaces. Photo by Robert Canfield.  Courtesy of: Robert Canfield

    Wedged into the hillside, a Big Sur, California, home participates in the terrain's unique melding of sea and land. Entering through large, seaward-facing windows, the sun illuminates this home's interior spaces. Photo by Robert Canfield.

    Courtesy of: Robert Canfield

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  A cabin on Canada's Georgian Bay is powered only by solar panels and operates on a graywater system. Photo by Mark Giglio.   Photo by: Mark Giglio

    A cabin on Canada's Georgian Bay is powered only by solar panels and operates on a graywater system. Photo by Mark Giglio. 

    Photo by: Mark Giglio

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