Empire State of Modern: 7 Upstate New York Houses

written by:
December 11, 2013
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  Kathleen Triem quit her job at a Manhattan design firm in July 1996 and moved with the man in her life, Peter Franck, to Omi, a small town in New York's Hudson Valley. They built a trapezoidal structure, nicknamed the Copper House, which sits on a hillside overlooking the Catskill Mountains. From a distance, it draws to mind the monolithic figures lining the shores of Easter Island. Photo by Barbel Miebach.  Photo by Barbel Miebach.   This originally appeared in Escape From New York.

    Kathleen Triem quit her job at a Manhattan design firm in July 1996 and moved with the man in her life, Peter Franck, to Omi, a small town in New York's Hudson Valley. They built a trapezoidal structure, nicknamed the Copper House, which sits on a hillside overlooking the Catskill Mountains. From a distance, it draws to mind the monolithic figures lining the shores of Easter Island. Photo by Barbel Miebach.

    Photo by Barbel Miebach.
    This originally appeared in Escape From New York.
  • 
  Clad with fiber cement board and wrapped in an MDO plywood solar screen, the Live-Work Home doesn't resemble a house so much as a small commercial or industrial structure—an impression enhanced by a garage-style bifold door that opens onto the front porch. The house, designed by Cook + Fox Architects, was one of three winning designs in the inaugural From the Ground Up competition, which Mark Robbins, Dean of the Syracuse University School of Architecture, devised as a way to breathe new life into the Near Westside, a once-vibrant collection of bungalows and shotgun cottages west of downtown Syracuse. Photo by Richard Barnes.  Photo by Richard Barnes. Courtesy of © Richard Barnes.  This originally appeared in Near Westside Story.

    Clad with fiber cement board and wrapped in an MDO plywood solar screen, the Live-Work Home doesn't resemble a house so much as a small commercial or industrial structure—an impression enhanced by a garage-style bifold door that opens onto the front porch. The house, designed by Cook + Fox Architects, was one of three winning designs in the inaugural From the Ground Up competition, which Mark Robbins, Dean of the Syracuse University School of Architecture, devised as a way to breathe new life into the Near Westside, a once-vibrant collection of bungalows and shotgun cottages west of downtown Syracuse. Photo by Richard Barnes.

    Photo by Richard Barnes. Courtesy of © Richard Barnes.
    This originally appeared in Near Westside Story.
  • 
  Passive solar design, which promotes passive means of generating and retaining warmth over active—and expensive—systems, is central to the success of R-House, another winning design in the From the Ground Up competition for the Near Westside neighborhood of Syracuse, New York. Solar gain—chiefly from rear-facing windows that cascade from roofline to threshold on the building’s south side—and heat generated by people and electrical equipment warm the house. A thick, superinsulated, and tightly sealed exterior minimizes heat loss, and an energy-recovery ventilation system transfers warmth from the inside air that is being exhausted to the fresh air being drawn from the outside. Photo by Richard Barnes.  Photo by Richard Barnes. Courtesy of © Richard Barnes.  This originally appeared in Project: R-House.

    Passive solar design, which promotes passive means of generating and retaining warmth over active—and expensive—systems, is central to the success of R-House, another winning design in the From the Ground Up competition for the Near Westside neighborhood of Syracuse, New York. Solar gain—chiefly from rear-facing windows that cascade from roofline to threshold on the building’s south side—and heat generated by people and electrical equipment warm the house. A thick, superinsulated, and tightly sealed exterior minimizes heat loss, and an energy-recovery ventilation system transfers warmth from the inside air that is being exhausted to the fresh air being drawn from the outside. Photo by Richard Barnes.

    Photo by Richard Barnes. Courtesy of © Richard Barnes.
    This originally appeared in Project: R-House.
  • 
  Architect Preston Scott Cohen resurrected an early 1800s barn in Pine Plains, New York, as a vacation home for a literary couple and their family, calling to mind both the agrarian spaciousness of the structure’s former life and the vernacular of its new function as a house. Photo by Raimund Koch.  Photo by Raimund Koch.   This originally appeared in Raising the Barn.

    Architect Preston Scott Cohen resurrected an early 1800s barn in Pine Plains, New York, as a vacation home for a literary couple and their family, calling to mind both the agrarian spaciousness of the structure’s former life and the vernacular of its new function as a house. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    Photo by Raimund Koch.
    This originally appeared in Raising the Barn.
  • 
  The past can be intimidating for architects working in older cities with limited examples of contemporary design, but Adam Sokol has managed to push a new look forward in Buffalo, New York, with his Birdhouse. Completed in 2011, the residence replaces a vacant lot on Bird Avenue—a rare opportunity for new construction in a healthy neighborhood defined by its collection of century-old infrastructure.    This originally appeared in Birdhouse Residence by Adam Sokol.

    The past can be intimidating for architects working in older cities with limited examples of contemporary design, but Adam Sokol has managed to push a new look forward in Buffalo, New York, with his Birdhouse. Completed in 2011, the residence replaces a vacant lot on Bird Avenue—a rare opportunity for new construction in a healthy neighborhood defined by its collection of century-old infrastructure.

    This originally appeared in Birdhouse Residence by Adam Sokol.
  • 
  In 2002, Tom Givone bought a toppling 200-year-old farmhouse in Eldred, New York, and painstakingly fashioned it into an elegantly rustic retreat that he has dubbed the Floating Farmhouse. Photo by Mark Mahaney.  Photo by Mark Mahaney.   This originally appeared in Hope Floats.

    In 2002, Tom Givone bought a toppling 200-year-old farmhouse in Eldred, New York, and painstakingly fashioned it into an elegantly rustic retreat that he has dubbed the Floating Farmhouse. Photo by Mark Mahaney.

    Photo by Mark Mahaney.
    This originally appeared in Hope Floats.
  • 
  In 2004, Maria Cook and Lance Compa, both of whom are on the faculty at Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations, bought a house outside Ithaca, New York, that their real estate agent had described to them as an "architect-designed modern." Set in a clearing on 14 acres of dense forest, the house is a stark, steel-sided box that at first blush clashes intensely with its surroundings. But Cook and Compa were transfixed by the floor-to-ceiling windows offering an expansive view of a gently sloping hill to the south. Photo by Adam Friedberg.  Photo by Adam Friedberg.   This originally appeared in Industrial Revolution.

    In 2004, Maria Cook and Lance Compa, both of whom are on the faculty at Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations, bought a house outside Ithaca, New York, that their real estate agent had described to them as an "architect-designed modern." Set in a clearing on 14 acres of dense forest, the house is a stark, steel-sided box that at first blush clashes intensely with its surroundings. But Cook and Compa were transfixed by the floor-to-ceiling windows offering an expansive view of a gently sloping hill to the south. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

    Photo by Adam Friedberg.
    This originally appeared in Industrial Revolution.
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