Emerald City: Modern Homes in Seattle Part Two

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September 23, 2013
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  Fifteen minutes from downtown Seattle, architects Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo transformed the neighborhood dump—a lot that had been vacant for 30 years—into their dream home. Read the entire article here. Photo by: Philip Newton  Photo by Philip Newton.   This originally appeared in Brand-New Secondhand.

    Fifteen minutes from downtown Seattle, architects Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo transformed the neighborhood dump—a lot that had been vacant for 30 years—into their dream home.

    Read the entire article here.

    Photo by: Philip Newton

    Photo by Philip Newton.
    This originally appeared in Brand-New Secondhand.
  • 
  All of the plywood, concrete, and steel surfaces inside the house were left unfinished. “We like to use natural materials in their raw state and minimize the use of synthetic surfaces and drywall,” says Mihalyo. Read the entire article here. Photo by Philip Newton.  Photo by Philip Newton.   This originally appeared in Brand-New Secondhand.

    All of the plywood, concrete, and steel surfaces inside the house were left unfinished. “We like to use natural materials in their raw state and minimize the use of synthetic surfaces and drywall,” says Mihalyo.

    Read the entire article here.

    Photo by Philip Newton.

    Photo by Philip Newton.
    This originally appeared in Brand-New Secondhand.
  • 
  A once-plain floating home on Seattle’s Portage Bay receives a much-needed renovation ten years in the making. Read the entire article here.  Courtesy of Ninebark Studio.  This originally appeared in A Renovated Boathouse on Seattle's Portage Bay .

    A once-plain floating home on Seattle’s Portage Bay receives a much-needed renovation ten years in the making.

    Read the entire article here.

    Courtesy of Ninebark Studio.
    This originally appeared in A Renovated Boathouse on Seattle's Portage Bay .
  • 
  For architect Michelle Linden, living and working in 600 square feet poses its challenges, but one of the biggest was completing a gut-renovation on the tightest of budgets—just $25,000. Originally built in the 1950s, Linden's home wasn't optimized for today's living styles, but was located in a neighborhood rich with amenities and close enough for her husband, Cameron, to bike to work. Location trumped the lack of storage, closed-off spaces, and outdated finishes, and with thoughtful planning and cost-conscious choices, Linden, who heads Seattle's Atelier A+D, crafted a home that's short on space, but long on personality and charm. Read the entire article here.     This originally appeared in Small in Seattle.

    For architect Michelle Linden, living and working in 600 square feet poses its challenges, but one of the biggest was completing a gut-renovation on the tightest of budgets—just $25,000. Originally built in the 1950s, Linden's home wasn't optimized for today's living styles, but was located in a neighborhood rich with amenities and close enough for her husband, Cameron, to bike to work. Location trumped the lack of storage, closed-off spaces, and outdated finishes, and with thoughtful planning and cost-conscious choices, Linden, who heads Seattle's Atelier A+D, crafted a home that's short on space, but long on personality and charm.

    Read the entire article here. 

    This originally appeared in Small in Seattle.
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  The living room coffee table is Michelle's own design and the Salema sofa was purchased from Area 51, a Seattle purveyor of new and vintage furniture. Read the entire article here.    This originally appeared in Small in Seattle.

    The living room coffee table is Michelle's own design and the Salema sofa was purchased from Area 51, a Seattle purveyor of new and vintage furniture.

    Read the entire article here.

    This originally appeared in Small in Seattle.
  • 
  When the Zimmerman family settled in Seattle, Washington, in the late 1990s they bought a 1,100-square-foot Craftsman built in the 1920s. Fast-forward to today. Not wanting to leave their beloved neighborhood, but hurting for space, they enlisted the help of local design-build firm Ninebark to create a separate living area. Working from sketches that the residents had from their uncle, Gary Schoemaker, an architect in New York, Ninebark realized a refined granny flat that serves as a playroom, office, and guesthouse for visitors, complete with a kitchenette and full bathroom. Read the entire article here.    This originally appeared in Garden Pavilion, Seattle.

    When the Zimmerman family settled in Seattle, Washington, in the late 1990s they bought a 1,100-square-foot Craftsman built in the 1920s. Fast-forward to today. Not wanting to leave their beloved neighborhood, but hurting for space, they enlisted the help of local design-build firm Ninebark to create a separate living area. Working from sketches that the residents had from their uncle, Gary Schoemaker, an architect in New York, Ninebark realized a refined granny flat that serves as a playroom, office, and guesthouse for visitors, complete with a kitchenette and full bathroom.

    Read the entire article here.

    This originally appeared in Garden Pavilion, Seattle.
  • 
  A rolling ladder made from salvaged wood and components leads to a small, yet well equipped, office. Read the entire article here.    This originally appeared in Garden Pavilion, Seattle.

    A rolling ladder made from salvaged wood and components leads to a small, yet well equipped, office.

    Read the entire article here.

    This originally appeared in Garden Pavilion, Seattle.
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