Color Coded: 7 Vibrant Exteriors

written by:
October 21, 2013
Adding a splash of color here and there, these 7 homes brighten their exteriors with bold hues.
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  Designer Jens Risom returns to his 1967 prefab off the coast of Rhode Island, readying it for his family's next generation. Photo by Floto + Warner.

    Designer Jens Risom returns to his 1967 prefab off the coast of Rhode Island, readying it for his family's next generation. Photo by Floto + Warner.

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  With a sleek prototype in Emeryville, California, under its belt, Simpatico Homes sets out to redefine prefab's cost—and footprint. Photo by Jake Stangel.

    With a sleek prototype in Emeryville, California, under its belt, Simpatico Homes sets out to redefine prefab's cost—and footprint. Photo by Jake Stangel.

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  Adventurous but subtle. Something different that doesn’t scream for attention. These were the prompts John and Erika Jessen gave to architect Elijah Huge for the addition to their 1920s home in New Haven, Connecticut. Photo by Andrew Rowat.

    Adventurous but subtle. Something different that doesn’t scream for attention. These were the prompts John and Erika Jessen gave to architect Elijah Huge for the addition to their 1920s home in New Haven, Connecticut. Photo by Andrew Rowat.

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  A path created with Stepstone's narrow concrete pavers meanders through the garden past the master bedroom. Photo by Dustin Aksland.

    A path created with Stepstone's narrow concrete pavers meanders through the garden past the master bedroom. Photo by Dustin Aksland.

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  The two-tone corrugated metal cladding helps the sheds blend into the landscape, along with windows custom-colored by the manufacturer to match. Photo by Mike Sinclair.

    The two-tone corrugated metal cladding helps the sheds blend into the landscape, along with windows custom-colored by the manufacturer to match. Photo by Mike Sinclair.

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  The wood-frame residence and studio are clad in vertical cedar siding—back then, a daring competitor to clapboard—instead of concrete to save costs. The effect is equally seamless, however: “If you drive by it fast enough,” Charles Gwathmey once said, “you still might mistake it for a concrete house.” Photo by Norman McGrath.

    The wood-frame residence and studio are clad in vertical cedar siding—back then, a daring competitor to clapboard—instead of concrete to save costs. The effect is equally seamless, however: “If you drive by it fast enough,” Charles Gwathmey once said, “you still might mistake it for a concrete house.” Photo by Norman McGrath.

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  The entire house is made from slabs of prefabricated, formaldehyde-free compressed straw.

    The entire house is made from slabs of prefabricated, formaldehyde-free compressed straw.

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