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In The City and Off the Grid

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From New York to Los Angeles, these self-sufficient homes prove that you don't have to live in the middle of nowhere to be off-the-grid.
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  Architect Vivian Manasc rebuilt this 2,500-square-foot loft in Edmonton, Alberta to be energy efficient with solar panels to generate electricity while waste heat emitted by the elevator core warms the Canadian home.  Photo by: Garth Crump

    Architect Vivian Manasc rebuilt this 2,500-square-foot loft in Edmonton, Alberta to be energy efficient with solar panels to generate electricity while waste heat emitted by the elevator core warms the Canadian home.

    Photo by: Garth Crump

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  The colorful 19th-story penthouse is designed for near net-zero energy consumption with views of the North Saskatchewan River and city skyline.  Photo by: Garth Crump

    The colorful 19th-story penthouse is designed for near net-zero energy consumption with views of the North Saskatchewan River and city skyline.

    Photo by: Garth Crump

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  When residents of a 100-year-old Brooklyn brownstone wanted a net-zero makeover, the result was Tighthouse, New York’s first certified Passive House. Photo by Hai Zhang.  Photo by: Hai Zhang

    When residents of a 100-year-old Brooklyn brownstone wanted a net-zero makeover, the result was Tighthouse, New York’s first certified Passive House. Photo by Hai Zhang.

    Photo by: Hai Zhang

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  Home designer Julie Torres Moskovitz used LED lighting, electric Jenn-Air appliances and solar panels to bring the home up-to-date with modern eco-friendly trends. Photo by Hai Zhang.  Photo by: Hai Zhang

    Home designer Julie Torres Moskovitz used LED lighting, electric Jenn-Air appliances and solar panels to bring the home up-to-date with modern eco-friendly trends. Photo by Hai Zhang.

    Photo by: Hai Zhang

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  Community gardens, tankless water heaters, low-flush toilets and energy-efficient appliances allow this Silver Lake neighborhood in Los Angeles to yield energy bills of $0. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    Community gardens, tankless water heaters, low-flush toilets and energy-efficient appliances allow this Silver Lake neighborhood in Los Angeles to yield energy bills of $0. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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  Designed by MASS Architecture and Design, each home features the option for homeowners to hook in solar panels. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    Designed by MASS Architecture and Design, each home features the option for homeowners to hook in solar panels. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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  This Venice, California home, designed by architects Angela Brooks and Lawrence Scarpa, uses luminous solar panels to generate electricity. Photo by Marvin Rand.

    This Venice, California home, designed by architects Angela Brooks and Lawrence Scarpa, uses luminous solar panels to generate electricity. Photo by Marvin Rand.

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  The home's solar panels work double duty by shading the home while providing electricity. Photo by Marvin Rand.  Photo by: Marvin Rand

    The home's solar panels work double duty by shading the home while providing electricity. Photo by Marvin Rand.

    Photo by: Marvin Rand

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