From the Archives: 5 Great My House Examples

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August 14, 2013
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  A Recent Grad's First Home in Austin The first year out of college is a wildcard for most people. Whether spent bumming around Europe with a backpack or slogging through a suffocating desk job, it’s often a year with little bearing on life’s next chapter. But Blake Dollahite—and his father—saw an opportunity in this transitional time to build a foundation for his future. With a small bank loan and a lot of helping hands, Dollahite dove into his first year of freedom by shackling himself to a rundown Austin bungalow and preparing to make it home. Photo by: Misty Keasler  Photo by Misty Keasler.   This originally appeared in Salvage Love.

    A Recent Grad's First Home in Austin

    The first year out of college is a wildcard for most people. Whether spent bumming around Europe with a backpack or slogging through a suffocating desk job, it’s often a year with little bearing on life’s next chapter. But Blake Dollahite—and his father—saw an opportunity in this transitional time to build a foundation for his future. With a small bank loan and a lot of helping hands, Dollahite dove into his first year of freedom by shackling himself to a rundown Austin bungalow and preparing to make it home.

    Photo by: Misty Keasler

    Photo by Misty Keasler.
    This originally appeared in Salvage Love.
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  A Shared Home for Jesuit Priests in Phoenix For men of the cloth, architecture has always been one earthly delight they've been encouraged to indulge. In Arizona, DeBartolo Architects continues the tradition in a rather unorthodox manner. Photo by: Bill Timmerman  Photo by Bill Timmerman.   This originally appeared in Houses of the Holy.

    A Shared Home for Jesuit Priests in Phoenix

    For men of the cloth, architecture has always been one earthly delight they've been encouraged to indulge. In Arizona, DeBartolo Architects continues the tradition in a rather unorthodox manner.

    Photo by: Bill Timmerman

    Photo by Bill Timmerman.
    This originally appeared in Houses of the Holy.
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  A New York Architect's 560-square-foot Apartment "I'm used to spending time on boats," says New York based architect and interior designer Page Goolrick, who has been sailing competitively for 15 years. "It's influenced my design. Sailing vessels are beautifully designed, flexible, made for performance, but also attractive. Photo by: Dean Kaufman  Photo by Dean Kaufman.   This originally appeared in Urban Vessel.

    A New York Architect's 560-square-foot Apartment

    "I'm used to spending time on boats," says New York based architect and interior designer Page Goolrick, who has been sailing competitively for 15 years. "It's influenced my design. Sailing vessels are beautifully designed, flexible, made for performance, but also attractive.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Photo by Dean Kaufman.
    This originally appeared in Urban Vessel.
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  A Young Family's Prefab Cabin in West Virginia A “tree house” of clean lines, ample glass, and thoughtful ingenuity lets a Washington, DC–area family and a stream of weekend guests enjoy prefab living in an unlikely locale: just outside Lost River, West Virginia. Photo by: Chris Mueller  Photo by Chris Mueller.   This originally appeared in Take Me Home.

    A Young Family's Prefab Cabin in West Virginia

    A “tree house” of clean lines, ample glass, and thoughtful ingenuity lets a Washington, DC–area family and a stream of weekend guests enjoy prefab living in an unlikely locale: just outside Lost River, West Virginia.

    Photo by: Chris Mueller

    Photo by Chris Mueller.
    This originally appeared in Take Me Home.
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  A Narrow Home for an Abandoned Lot in Dayton, Ohio It’s become an all-too-familiar scenario all across America: A city’s downtown, once a thriving place to live and work, has slowly withered and become decrepit. Middle-income families flee to the suburbs to settle in planned communities, city buildings fall into disrepair, and empty weed-filled lots proliferate. So when retired couple Peter and Joan Bracher decided to sell their brick-sided traditional colonial outside of Dayton, Ohio, and build a new home on an infill lot in the Fairgrounds neighborhood just south of the city center, it was a radical departure from the standard palm tree–seeking relocation of most retirees and a pioneering move in terms of the area’s recent urban-regeneration effort. Photo by: Juliana Sohn

    A Narrow Home for an Abandoned Lot in Dayton, Ohio

    It’s become an all-too-familiar scenario all across America: A city’s downtown, once a thriving place to live and work, has slowly withered and become decrepit. Middle-income families flee to the suburbs to settle in planned communities, city buildings fall into disrepair, and empty weed-filled lots proliferate. So when retired couple Peter and Joan Bracher decided to sell their brick-sided traditional colonial outside of Dayton, Ohio, and build a new home on an infill lot in the Fairgrounds neighborhood just south of the city center, it was a radical departure from the standard palm tree–seeking relocation of most retirees and a pioneering move in terms of the area’s recent urban-regeneration effort.

    Photo by: Juliana Sohn

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