Amazing Futuristic Homes from Austria to Spain

written by:
August 19, 2013
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  It Takes a Villa An angular hydroponic rooftop garden gently tops this suburban sustainable home in Liers, Spain. Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel  Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.   This originally appeared in It Takes a Villa.

    It Takes a Villa

    An angular hydroponic rooftop garden gently tops this suburban sustainable home in Liers, Spain.

    Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel

    Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.
    This originally appeared in It Takes a Villa.
  • 
  It Takes a Villa The concrete volumes of the glass-clad upper and lower floors are independent to allow expansion and compression. Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel  Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.   This originally appeared in It Takes a Villa.

    It Takes a Villa

    The concrete volumes of the glass-clad upper and lower floors are independent to allow expansion and compression.

    Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel

    Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.
    This originally appeared in It Takes a Villa.
  • 
  The Penthouse Has Landed This dazzling penthouse by architect Delugan Meissi's narrow terrace hangs precariously over the streets of Vienna. Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus  Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.   This originally appeared in The Penthouse Has Landed.

    The Penthouse Has Landed

    This dazzling penthouse by architect Delugan Meissi's narrow terrace hangs precariously over the streets of Vienna.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

    Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.
    This originally appeared in The Penthouse Has Landed.
  • 
  The Penthouse Has Landed The “culinary cockpit” (a.k.a. the kitchen) stands at the center of the apartment on a raised platform. A long, white slanted counter contains hi-fi speakers and a BUS-system panel of 18 buttons for controlling lights, curtains, heating, ventilation, etc.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus  Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.   This originally appeared in The Penthouse Has Landed.

    The Penthouse Has Landed

    The “culinary cockpit” (a.k.a. the kitchen) stands at the center of the apartment on a raised platform. A long, white slanted counter contains hi-fi speakers and a BUS-system panel of 18 buttons for controlling lights, curtains, heating, ventilation, etc. 

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

    Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.
    This originally appeared in The Penthouse Has Landed.
  • 
  All Together Now In this diminutive New York apartment’s new incarnation, the main living area is a family room that morphs—after the boys go to sleep in the back bedroom—into the parents’ lair. As Krastev puts it, “During the day it’s a one-bedroom apartment, at night, a studio.” Photo by: David Allee  Photo by David Allee.   This originally appeared in All Together Now.

    All Together Now

    In this diminutive New York apartment’s new incarnation, the main living area is a family room that morphs—after the boys go to sleep in the back bedroom—into the parents’ lair. As Krastev puts it, “During the day it’s a one-bedroom apartment, at night, a studio.”

    Photo by: David Allee

    Photo by David Allee.
    This originally appeared in All Together Now.
  • 
    All Together Now The overhead skylight, finished in matte, provides a visual flurry. "It’s kind of a melting design that comes from above and goes down the shelves,” says architect Erich Schoenenberger of su11 architecture + design. Photo by: David Allee  Photo by David Allee.   This originally appeared in All Together Now.

     

    All Together Now

    The overhead skylight, finished in matte, provides a visual flurry. "It’s kind of a melting design that comes from above and goes down the shelves,” says architect Erich Schoenenberger of su11 architecture + design.

    Photo by: David Allee

    Photo by David Allee.
    This originally appeared in All Together Now.
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