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All in the Family: 7 Spaces Designed by Couples

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They say the family that designs together stays together. OK, nobody says that, but there may be something to it. Harmony at home can enhance the creative process if these projects from Dwell's archives, all of which were tackled by couples, are any indication.
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  Since founding their practice in 1994, Takaharu and Yui Tezuka have, to increasing renown, built a science museum, a hospital, commercial and apartment complexes, and a flighat of single-family homes, all characterized by a strong relationship between interior and exterior space. Their residential projects place special emphasis on indoor-outdoor living, with configurations that include rooftop floor plans, glass façades that can open 360 degrees, decks, verandas, and viewscapes. Photo by Adam Friedberg.  Photo by: Adam Friedberg

    Since founding their practice in 1994, Takaharu and Yui Tezuka have, to increasing renown, built a science museum, a hospital, commercial and apartment complexes, and a flighat of single-family homes, all characterized by a strong relationship between interior and exterior space. Their residential projects place special emphasis on indoor-outdoor living, with configurations that include rooftop floor plans, glass façades that can open 360 degrees, decks, verandas, and viewscapes. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

    Photo by: Adam Friedberg

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  Milena Karanesheva and Mischa Witzmann—the married couple behind Paris-based Karawitz Architecture—designed a 1,733-square-foot house  that uses only 4,200 kilowatt-hours per year—about a tenth of what a conventionally constructed house in France might use. With no other means of heating or cooling than those generated by the structure—a tenet of Passive House design—the new home is modeled on the French country dwellings of the area. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.  Courtesy of: © 2012 Nicholas Calcott

    Milena Karanesheva and Mischa Witzmann—the married couple behind Paris-based Karawitz Architecture—designed a 1,733-square-foot house that uses only 4,200 kilowatt-hours per year—about a tenth of what a conventionally constructed house in France might use. With no other means of heating or cooling than those generated by the structure—a tenet of Passive House design—the new home is modeled on the French country dwellings of the area. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.

    Courtesy of: © 2012 Nicholas Calcott

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  Matthew and Lisa Trzebiatowski collaborated on a three-story steel, glass, concrete, and wire-mesh house that abuts the North Mountain Preserve in the edgy Phoenix neighborhood of Sunnyslope. Photo by Gregg Segal.  Photo by: Gregg Segal

    Matthew and Lisa Trzebiatowski collaborated on a three-story steel, glass, concrete, and wire-mesh house that abuts the North Mountain Preserve in the edgy Phoenix neighborhood of Sunnyslope. Photo by Gregg Segal.

    Photo by: Gregg Segal

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  Lisa Gray and Alan Organschi, the married couple behind Gray Organschi Architecture, designed this 1,100-square-foot guest cottage for Suzanne and Brooks Kelley in Guilford Connecticut.

    Lisa Gray and Alan Organschi, the married couple behind Gray Organschi Architecture, designed this 1,100-square-foot guest cottage for Suzanne and Brooks Kelley in Guilford Connecticut.

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  Lawrence Scarpa and Angela Brooks are architects and co-principals in a Santa Monica design firm where exploring new technologies is a daily practice. When it came time to build a home for themselves, they were eager to see how far they could go in applying their green-design know-how in their everyday lives. Photo by Marvin Rand.  Photo by: Marvin Rand

    Lawrence Scarpa and Angela Brooks are architects and co-principals in a Santa Monica design firm where exploring new technologies is a daily practice. When it came time to build a home for themselves, they were eager to see how far they could go in applying their green-design know-how in their everyday lives. Photo by Marvin Rand.

    Photo by: Marvin Rand

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  The husband-and-wife architectural team of Nicole Robertson and Richard Garber designed a sustainable concrete house on an infill lot in Jersey City, New Jersey, for Dennis Carpenter and his cat, Miska. Photo by Samantha Contis.  Photo by: Samantha Contis

    The husband-and-wife architectural team of Nicole Robertson and Richard Garber designed a sustainable concrete house on an infill lot in Jersey City, New Jersey, for Dennis Carpenter and his cat, Miska. Photo by Samantha Contis.

    Photo by: Samantha Contis

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  Architects Sally and Ken Wilson updated a Charles Goodman house  on a cul-de-sac in Alexandria, Virginia. Photo by Eric Laignel.  Photo by: Eric Laignel

    Architects Sally and Ken Wilson updated a Charles Goodman house on a cul-de-sac in Alexandria, Virginia. Photo by Eric Laignel.

    Photo by: Eric Laignel

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