9 Renovations in Brooklyn

written by:
January 22, 2014
What’s not to love about Brooklyn? Here we present 9 funky, space-saving renovation projects from Dwell’s pages that will make you fall even harder for the borough.
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  A family enlists Brooklyn design-build firm MADE to renovate a brownstone using surplus and salvaged materials for a budget-conscious patina.  Photo by Matthew Williams.   Photo by: Matthew Williams

    A family enlists Brooklyn design-build firm MADE to renovate a brownstone using surplus and salvaged materials for a budget-conscious patina.  Photo by Matthew Williams. 

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

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  A couple gets their hands dirty in Brooklyn by rehabilitating a 19th-century tenement to reveal decades of layers and scores of possibilities. The bedroom is tucked in the back of the residence and doesn’t receive a lot of natural light. The couple emphasized the coziness of the space by painting the walls in Space Black from Benjamin Moore and selecting an oversize artwork, Flotar, 2011, by Christian Curiel. The bed is a Louis XV–style reproduction, approximately from the 1950s, that Gil and DeSimio found on eBay. Photo by Paul Barbera.   Photo by: Paul Barbera

    A couple gets their hands dirty in Brooklyn by rehabilitating a 19th-century tenement to reveal decades of layers and scores of possibilities. The bedroom is tucked in the back of the residence and doesn’t receive a lot of natural light. The couple emphasized the coziness of the space by painting the walls in Space Black from Benjamin Moore and selecting an oversize artwork, Flotar, 2011, by Christian Curiel. The bed is a Louis XV–style reproduction, approximately from the 1950s, that Gil and DeSimio found on eBay. Photo by Paul Barbera. 

    Photo by: Paul Barbera

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  Portland-based studio Jessica Helgerson Interior Design rehauled a Brooklyn brownstone with furnishings and finishes in bold colors and tactile materials. Dwell checks in with lead designer Chelsie Lee to get the scoop on the furniture and fittings.A quartet of red paints (Raspberry Truffle, Million Dollar Red, Vermillion, Arroyo Red), all by Benjamin Moore, make the built-in shelving in the dining area pop. The table is a custom design made of bookmatched walnut slabs joined by lacquered butterflies. The chairs are vintage Paul McCobb lacquered in turquoise (Benjamin Moore's Aruba Blue). The Ligne Roset Ruché sofa, designed by Inga Sempé, separates the living and dining spaces. The chandelier is by David Weeks Studio. Photo by Andrew Cammarano.   Photo by: Andrew Cammarano

    Portland-based studio Jessica Helgerson Interior Design rehauled a Brooklyn brownstone with furnishings and finishes in bold colors and tactile materials. Dwell checks in with lead designer Chelsie Lee to get the scoop on the furniture and fittings.A quartet of red paints (Raspberry Truffle, Million Dollar Red, Vermillion, Arroyo Red), all by Benjamin Moore, make the built-in shelving in the dining area pop. The table is a custom design made of bookmatched walnut slabs joined by lacquered butterflies. The chairs are vintage Paul McCobb lacquered in turquoise (Benjamin Moore's Aruba Blue). The Ligne Roset Ruché sofa, designed by Inga Sempé, separates the living and dining spaces. The chandelier is by David Weeks Studio. Photo by Andrew Cammarano. 

    Photo by: Andrew Cammarano

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  How do you make a Brooklyn brownstone more sustainable? First, get rid of the brownstone. All of the Jenn-Air appliances, including the washer and dryer, are electric, as the owners asked the city to cut the gas line to the house. The kitchen cabinetry is from Ikea and features custom matte gray doors and Silestone countertops. The floorboards are reclaimed maple from an old tire factory, sanded and stained gray. Photo by Hai Zhang.   Photo by: Hai Zhang

    How do you make a Brooklyn brownstone more sustainable? First, get rid of the brownstone. All of the Jenn-Air appliances, including the washer and dryer, are electric, as the owners asked the city to cut the gas line to the house. The kitchen cabinetry is from Ikea and features custom matte gray doors and Silestone countertops. The floorboards are reclaimed maple from an old tire factory, sanded and stained gray. Photo by Hai Zhang. 

    Photo by: Hai Zhang

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  A couple takes a minimalist approach to their Brooklyn apartment, focusing on supple materials, subtle gradations of color, and custom finishes by local craftsmen.The Mandayam–Vohra family gathers under one of Workstead’s signature three-arm chandeliers, shown here in its horizontal configuration. Photo by Matthew Williams. 

    A couple takes a minimalist approach to their Brooklyn apartment, focusing on supple materials, subtle gradations of color, and custom finishes by local craftsmen.The Mandayam–Vohra family gathers under one of Workstead’s signature three-arm chandeliers, shown here in its horizontal configuration. Photo by Matthew Williams. 

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  The exposed ceiling beams and inserted steel framing system are visible in the lower level of this home in Brooklyn, where the residents relax with their son. Photo by Matthew Williams.   Photo by: Matthew WilliamsCourtesy of: matthew williams

    The exposed ceiling beams and inserted steel framing system are visible in the lower level of this home in Brooklyn, where the residents relax with their son. Photo by Matthew Williams. 

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Courtesy of: matthew williams

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  When graphic designers Jeanette and Mike Abbink left behind their loft in San Francisco—with collected ephemera, a voluminous library, and a parcel of paintings in tow—they didn’t know where they would land in the Big Apple. One renovation and one Welsh terrier later, they’re back on track in Brooklyn.In the home office/dining room, the “Ziggy Diamond” wallpaper (behind the surreal Erle Loran painting) comes from Flavor Paper, a New Orleans firm that prints wall coverings to order, and the ingenious folding table is by Swedish designer Bruno Matthson. Photo by Dean Kaufman.   Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    When graphic designers Jeanette and Mike Abbink left behind their loft in San Francisco—with collected ephemera, a voluminous library, and a parcel of paintings in tow—they didn’t know where they would land in the Big Apple. One renovation and one Welsh terrier later, they’re back on track in Brooklyn.

    In the home office/dining room, the “Ziggy Diamond” wallpaper (behind the surreal Erle Loran painting) comes from Flavor Paper, a New Orleans firm that prints wall coverings to order, and the ingenious folding table is by Swedish designer Bruno Matthson. Photo by Dean Kaufman. 

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  A few big ideas—and some careful workmanship—transform the very small kitchen of a one-bedroom Brooklyn apartment into an expansive space suited to a young professional with a taste for design. Photo by Jeremy Liebman.   Photo by: Jeremy Liebman

    A few big ideas—and some careful workmanship—transform the very small kitchen of a one-bedroom Brooklyn apartment into an expansive space suited to a young professional with a taste for design. Photo by Jeremy Liebman. 

    Photo by: Jeremy Liebman

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  A Brooklyn architect shows what a little elbow grease, a healthy dose of naïveté, and a decade can accomplish. In the living room Daphne the dog keeps company with a Case Study Day Bed from Modernica, a LCM chair by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller, and a painting by the Brooklyn artist Joyce Kim. Photo by Dustin Aksland.   Photo by: Dustin Aksland

    A Brooklyn architect shows what a little elbow grease, a healthy dose of naïveté, and a decade can accomplish. In the living room Daphne the dog keeps company with a Case Study Day Bed from Modernica, a LCM chair by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller, and a painting by the Brooklyn artist Joyce Kim. Photo by Dustin Aksland. 

    Photo by: Dustin Aksland

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