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9 Prefab Homes Set on Stilts

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When tricky terrain poses construction problems, hoisting a prefabricated home up on stilts offers a practical, eco-friendly solution.
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  A 1961 prefab by architect Richard Meier, designed for New York City artist and illustrator Saul Lambert, rises above the Long Island dunes on a series of wooden struts. Photo courtesy Richard Meier & Partners Architects.

    A 1961 prefab by architect Richard Meier, designed for New York City artist and illustrator Saul Lambert, rises above the Long Island dunes on a series of wooden struts. Photo courtesy Richard Meier & Partners Architects.

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  In order to preserve the integrity of the site and its surrounding ecosystem, architect Anthony Pellecchia anchored his Washington vacation house on six prefabricated moment frames, raising a large portion of the structure to allow the natural slope to continue untouched beneath. Photo by Philip Newton.  Photo by: Philip Newton

    In order to preserve the integrity of the site and its surrounding ecosystem, architect Anthony Pellecchia anchored his Washington vacation house on six prefabricated moment frames, raising a large portion of the structure to allow the natural slope to continue untouched beneath. Photo by Philip Newton.

    Photo by: Philip Newton

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  A prefab located in Australia’s rugged outback consists of three pavilions elevated on steel posts to capture river views and allow breezes, lizards, and rain runoff to circulate freely underneath. Photo by Patrick Bingham Hall.  Photo by: Patrick Bingham Hall

    A prefab located in Australia’s rugged outback consists of three pavilions elevated on steel posts to capture river views and allow breezes, lizards, and rain runoff to circulate freely underneath. Photo by Patrick Bingham Hall.

    Photo by: Patrick Bingham Hall

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  A vacation home in Victoria, Australia, constructed from prefabricated corrugated steel panels, rests on a series of steel stilts in order to take full advantage of the site’s 360-degree panoramic view. Photo by Peter Hyatt.  Photo by: Peter Hyatt

    A vacation home in Victoria, Australia, constructed from prefabricated corrugated steel panels, rests on a series of steel stilts in order to take full advantage of the site’s 360-degree panoramic view. Photo by Peter Hyatt.

    Photo by: Peter Hyatt

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  To reduce impact at a site in northeastern Belgium, design firm Baumraum prefabricated a 450-square-foot retreat and craned it atop 19 steel columns. It's arranged so that the surrounding trees’ roots aren't harmed. Photo courtesy Baumraum.

    To reduce impact at a site in northeastern Belgium, design firm Baumraum prefabricated a 450-square-foot retreat and craned it atop 19 steel columns. It's arranged so that the surrounding trees’ roots aren't harmed. Photo courtesy Baumraum.

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  The 312-square-foot Fish Camp cabin, one of a series of kit homes designed by Rocio Romero, can be set atop oversize flood-rated pylons in harsh environments. Photo by Dean Kaufman.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    The 312-square-foot Fish Camp cabin, one of a series of kit homes designed by Rocio Romero, can be set atop oversize flood-rated pylons in harsh environments. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  A version of architect Tadashi Murai’s modular, customizable Aero House was trucked into a hidden valley west of Tokyo and set on stilts amidst the wooded landscape. Photo by Alessio Guarino.  Photo by: Alessio Guarino

    A version of architect Tadashi Murai’s modular, customizable Aero House was trucked into a hidden valley west of Tokyo and set on stilts amidst the wooded landscape. Photo by Alessio Guarino.

    Photo by: Alessio Guarino

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  To meet the topographical challenges posed by a seaside site in New Zealand, a group of architecture students elevated a compact prefab vacation home on a series of piers. Photo by Simon Devitt.  Photo by: Simon DevittCourtesy of: Simon Devitt

    To meet the topographical challenges posed by a seaside site in New Zealand, a group of architecture students elevated a compact prefab vacation home on a series of piers. Photo by Simon Devitt.

    Photo by: Simon Devitt

    Courtesy of: Simon Devitt

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  The steel framing system used for a prefab home in California’s desert adjusts to the site’s topography so that no harsh grading of the land is necessary. Photo by Misha Gravenor.  Photo by: Misha Gravenor

    The steel framing system used for a prefab home in California’s desert adjusts to the site’s topography so that no harsh grading of the land is necessary. Photo by Misha Gravenor.

    Photo by: Misha Gravenor

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