8 Modern Mountainside Homes

written by:
November 19, 2013
Nothing beats a splendid view of a majestic mountaintop, and there’s no better venue from which to enjoy the vista than a modern house. Here are 8 homes from our pages that celebrate mountain living.
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  At the base of Echo Mountain in Phoenix, a geometric home by Wendell Burnette opens up to the surrounding desert landscape. Photo by Dean Kaufman. 

    At the base of Echo Mountain in Phoenix, a geometric home by Wendell Burnette opens up to the surrounding desert landscape. Photo by Dean Kaufman. 

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  In Salt Lake City, a place not renowned for progressive architecture, Brent Jespersen built a luminous canyon retreat—using his architect father and a famed Utah modernist as his guides. The Jespersen residence sits in virtual isolation atop Emigration Canyon. With its oversize sliding glass doors, flat roof, and meticulous attention to geometric principles, the recently completed home creates a haven in the mountain wilderness. Photo by Zubin Shroff.   Photo by: Zubin Shroff

    In Salt Lake City, a place not renowned for progressive architecture, Brent Jespersen built a luminous canyon retreat—using his architect father and a famed Utah modernist as his guides. The Jespersen residence sits in virtual isolation atop Emigration Canyon. With its oversize sliding glass doors, flat roof, and meticulous attention to geometric principles, the recently completed home creates a haven in the mountain wilderness. Photo by Zubin Shroff. 

    Photo by: Zubin Shroff

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  A Marmol Radziner–designed prefab house, trucked onto a remote Northern California site, takes the pain out of the construction process. Inside, it's all about the views. Photo by Dwight Eschliman.   Photo by: Dwight Eschliman

    A Marmol Radziner–designed prefab house, trucked onto a remote Northern California site, takes the pain out of the construction process. Inside, it's all about the views. Photo by Dwight Eschliman. 

    Photo by: Dwight Eschliman

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  When Andy Linsky, a realtor specializing in mid-century homes, and his partner Michael Thomas, set out to build a home of their own, they enlisted architect Ana Escalante to realize their vision. After seeing just one project by the architect, the duo knew Escalante would be adept at creating a home worthy of the pedigreed surroundings in Palm Springs, California. The result—a block, steel, and glass 7,600 square foot structure that blends in with the many mid-century homes the desert community is known for, belying the home’s youth. The home’s exteriors wrap around the side, offering additional opportunities to bask in the picturesque surroundings. Photo by Justin Keena.   

    When Andy Linsky, a realtor specializing in mid-century homes, and his partner Michael Thomas, set out to build a home of their own, they enlisted architect Ana Escalante to realize their vision. After seeing just one project by the architect, the duo knew Escalante would be adept at creating a home worthy of the pedigreed surroundings in Palm Springs, California. The result—a block, steel, and glass 7,600 square foot structure that blends in with the many mid-century homes the desert community is known for, belying the home’s youth. The home’s exteriors wrap around the side, offering additional opportunities to bask in the picturesque surroundings. Photo by Justin Keena.   

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  Four Box House by Seoul architect Byoung-soo Cho perches on a rugged mountainside in northern Seoul’s Pyeongchandong district, making for spectacular views. Photo by Jeremy Murch.  Photo by: Jeremy Murch

    Four Box House by Seoul architect Byoung-soo Cho perches on a rugged mountainside in northern Seoul’s Pyeongchandong district, making for spectacular views. Photo by Jeremy Murch.

    Photo by: Jeremy Murch

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  Built-ins abound in this renovation of a 1970s lodge perched high in the French Alps. H2O Architectes devised a plan to increase livable space while leaving the structure intact. What results is a contemporary ski chalet that makes the most of its small footprint thanks to bunk beds, hidden storage, and streamlined circulation.   Courtesy of: Julien Attard

    Built-ins abound in this renovation of a 1970s lodge perched high in the French Alps. H2O Architectes devised a plan to increase livable space while leaving the structure intact. What results is a contemporary ski chalet that makes the most of its small footprint thanks to bunk beds, hidden storage, and streamlined circulation. 

    Courtesy of: Julien Attard

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  Eric Logan's guest house in Jackson, Wyoming, is adjacent to his family’s home. The interiors are made up of oiled masonite wall paneling, raw MDF cabinetry, and an oiled concrete floor. Photo by Misha Gravenor.  Photo by: Misha Gravenor

    Eric Logan's guest house in Jackson, Wyoming, is adjacent to his family’s home. The interiors are made up of oiled masonite wall paneling, raw MDF cabinetry, and an oiled concrete floor. Photo by Misha Gravenor.

    Photo by: Misha Gravenor

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  In an unlikely mountaintop locale, Anderson Anderson Architecture crafted a home out of a complex composition of off-the-shelf components, paving new paths for the prefabricated construction industry. Looking like a jewel box at dusk, Scott Stafne’s Cantilever House rests easy in the middle of the Washington woods. With miles of hiking trails, lakes, and waterfalls to explore, Stafne’s property provides almost unlimited opportunity for outdoor adventures. The strong and sturdy house acts as a warm respite from the elements when the weather won’t cooperate, which is often—horizontal rain and whipping winds can be the norm. Photo by John Clark.

    In an unlikely mountaintop locale, Anderson Anderson Architecture crafted a home out of a complex composition of off-the-shelf components, paving new paths for the prefabricated construction industry. Looking like a jewel box at dusk, Scott Stafne’s Cantilever House rests easy in the middle of the Washington woods. With miles of hiking trails, lakes, and waterfalls to explore, Stafne’s property provides almost unlimited opportunity for outdoor adventures. The strong and sturdy house acts as a warm respite from the elements when the weather won’t cooperate, which is often—horizontal rain and whipping winds can be the norm. Photo by John Clark.

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