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7 Small Homes in Japan

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In many cities, space is limited. These seven Japanese homes feature innovative storage options, tiny gardens and modern design.
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  In this prefab compound, inhabited by Yasuo Moriyama and six rental tenants, each room is partitioned in a separate box. This innovative design, created by the Office of Ryue Nishizawa, features a living room that functions publicly as well as an open outdoor area. Photo by Dean Kaufman.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    In this prefab compound, inhabited by Yasuo Moriyama and six rental tenants, each room is partitioned in a separate box. This innovative design, created by the Office of Ryue Nishizawa, features a living room that functions publicly as well as an open outdoor area. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Millennium City is an experiment in sustainable living created by Japanese architect Hiroshi Iguchi. The buildings utilize natural light by using floor-to-ceiling windows as walls. Inhabitants of the commune use the space as a way to escape from the hustle of nearby Tokyo. Photo by Alessio Guarino.

    Millennium City is an experiment in sustainable living created by Japanese architect Hiroshi Iguchi. The buildings utilize natural light by using floor-to-ceiling windows as walls. Inhabitants of the commune use the space as a way to escape from the hustle of nearby Tokyo. Photo by Alessio Guarino.

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  A kaidan dansu, or staircase cabinet, is a traditional way to utilize space in Japan. In this 1,078-square-foot home located in the city of Koriyama, Nihonmatsu-based architect Kotaro Anzai created a custom-built arrangement that the residents use to store items in an organized but innovative way. Photo by Osamu Abe.  Photo by: Osamu AbeCourtesy of: Copyright:ave

    A kaidan dansu, or staircase cabinet, is a traditional way to utilize space in Japan. In this 1,078-square-foot home located in the city of Koriyama, Nihonmatsu-based architect Kotaro Anzai created a custom-built arrangement that the residents use to store items in an organized but innovative way. Photo by Osamu Abe.

    Photo by: Osamu Abe

    Courtesy of: Copyright:ave

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  Located in a tightly-packed neighborhood in busy Tokyo, lies a small home built with black metal facade. Motoshi Yatabe, along with his architect brother-in-law, created the space which includes an enclosed terrace and a large, multi-purpose room used as a living area, dining room, and kitchen space. Photo by Dean Kaufman.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Located in a tightly-packed neighborhood in busy Tokyo, lies a small home built with black metal facade. Motoshi Yatabe, along with his architect brother-in-law, created the space which includes an enclosed terrace and a large, multi-purpose room used as a living area, dining room, and kitchen space. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Designed by Mount Fuji Architects Studio, this small Tokyo home features an array of wood, from oak boards hammered into a herring-bone pattern of the walls and ceiling to wooden furniture. “Using a different material for the wall versus the ceiling versus the floor has become a symbol that signifies a typical ‘house,’” says Masahiro Harada. “I wanted to get away from that." Photo by Ryota Atarashi.

    Designed by Mount Fuji Architects Studio, this small Tokyo home features an array of wood, from oak boards hammered into a herring-bone pattern of the walls and ceiling to wooden furniture. “Using a different material for the wall versus the ceiling versus the floor has become a symbol that signifies a typical ‘house,’” says Masahiro Harada. “I wanted to get away from that." Photo by Ryota Atarashi.

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  West of Tokyo, this sustainable home, features everything from a wind generator to natural moss-planted insulation. The module, roughly 20-by-8 feet in size, stands as a model for eco-friendly innovation. Photo by Alessio Guarino.  Photo by: Alessio Guarino

    West of Tokyo, this sustainable home, features everything from a wind generator to natural moss-planted insulation. The module, roughly 20-by-8 feet in size, stands as a model for eco-friendly innovation. Photo by Alessio Guarino.

    Photo by: Alessio Guarino

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  This luminous home, designed by architect Makoto Tanijiri, was innovated as a way to confound convention. “We were able to mix categories that are usually separate,” says Tanijiri. “Walls became windows and windows became walls.” Photo by Toshiyuki Yano.  Photo by: Toshiyuki YanoCourtesy of: Toshiyuki Yano

    This luminous home, designed by architect Makoto Tanijiri, was innovated as a way to confound convention. “We were able to mix categories that are usually separate,” says Tanijiri. “Walls became windows and windows became walls.” Photo by Toshiyuki Yano.

    Photo by: Toshiyuki Yano

    Courtesy of: Toshiyuki Yano

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