7 Modern Stone Homes

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September 16, 2013
  • 
  Architect Piers Taylor’s renovation of an old stone gameskeeper’s cottage in the English countryside outside of Bath, complete with a castellated roof and sweeping meadow below, is an exercise in dramatic modernization. Photo by Ben Anders.  Photo by Ben Anders.   This originally appeared in Taylor Made.

    Architect Piers Taylor’s renovation of an old stone gameskeeper’s cottage in the English countryside outside of Bath, complete with a castellated roof and sweeping meadow below, is an exercise in dramatic modernization. Photo by Ben Anders.

    Photo by Ben Anders.
    This originally appeared in Taylor Made.
  • 
  For their weekend home in rural Connecticut, architects Lisa Gray and Alan Organschi retained the original stone foundation, and added new gabion walls as a complement. Photos by Andrea Chu.  Photo by Andrea Chu.   This originally appeared in Set on Stone.

    For their weekend home in rural Connecticut, architects Lisa Gray and Alan Organschi retained the original stone foundation, and added new gabion walls as a complement. Photos by Andrea Chu.

    Photo by Andrea Chu.
    This originally appeared in Set on Stone.
  • 
  A couple in northern Italy trade a cramped flat for a renovated farmhouse in the country, in which architect Filippo Caprioglio paired the indigenous sandstone of the existing structure with teak mounted on two-foot-wide panels. The structure at right holds the glass-topped kitchen. Photo by Helenio Barbetta.    This originally appeared in 5 Modern Historical Home Renovations in Italy.

    A couple in northern Italy trade a cramped flat for a renovated farmhouse in the country, in which architect Filippo Caprioglio paired the indigenous sandstone of the existing structure with teak mounted on two-foot-wide panels. The structure at right holds the glass-topped kitchen. Photo by Helenio Barbetta.

    This originally appeared in 5 Modern Historical Home Renovations in Italy.
  • 
  In perhaps the most literal use of the material, photographer Gunnar Knechtel gives us a tour of Spain’s Canary Islands, where, on the isle of Tenerife, people have built houses right into the coastal rock.  Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.   This originally appeared in On The Rocks.

    In perhaps the most literal use of the material, photographer Gunnar Knechtel gives us a tour of Spain’s Canary Islands, where, on the isle of Tenerife, people have built houses right into the coastal rock.

    Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.
    This originally appeared in On The Rocks.
  • 
  This 1930s farmhouse on the coast of Tuscany is sited on a podere, land claimed from the low-lying salt marshes by the Fascist government in the early decades of the 20th century. Photo by Jacob Langvad. 

    This 1930s farmhouse on the coast of Tuscany is sited on a podere, land claimed from the low-lying salt marshes by the Fascist government in the early decades of the 20th century. Photo by Jacob Langvad

  • 
  At Marcel Breuer's 1959 Hooper House II, outside Baltimore, a stone wall delineates the courtyard, which divides the "bi-nuclear" house into adult areas and children's areas, including a playroom. Photo by Zubin Shroff.  Photo by Zubin Shroff.   This originally appeared in Marcel Breuer Hooper House II.

    At Marcel Breuer's 1959 Hooper House II, outside Baltimore, a stone wall delineates the courtyard, which divides the "bi-nuclear" house into adult areas and children's areas, including a playroom. Photo by Zubin Shroff.

    Photo by Zubin Shroff.
    This originally appeared in Marcel Breuer Hooper House II.
  • 
  Hagerty House, built in 1938 along the rocky coastline of Cohasset, Massachusetts, was the first United States commission by Walter Gropius. He sited the structure a precarious 20 feet from the shore and let the setting dictate the design: Granite harvested from the site was used for half of the house’s base as well as for the mortared stone walls located at the front and rear. Photo by Dean Kaufman.  Photo by Dean Kaufman.   This originally appeared in Walter Gropius, Hagerty House.

    Hagerty House, built in 1938 along the rocky coastline of Cohasset, Massachusetts, was the first United States commission by Walter Gropius. He sited the structure a precarious 20 feet from the shore and let the setting dictate the design: Granite harvested from the site was used for half of the house’s base as well as for the mortared stone walls located at the front and rear. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Photo by Dean Kaufman.
    This originally appeared in Walter Gropius, Hagerty House.
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