7 Modern Homes in Texas

written by:
October 11, 2013
  • 
  The Balcones house, designed by homeowner and architectural designer Elizabeth Alford, brings the outdoors in. Photo by Brent Humphreys.   Photo by Brent Humphreys.   This originally appeared in Hillside Mid-Century Home Renovation in Texas.

    The Balcones house, designed by homeowner and architectural designer Elizabeth Alford, brings the outdoors in. Photo by Brent Humphreys. 

    Photo by Brent Humphreys.
    This originally appeared in Hillside Mid-Century Home Renovation in Texas.
  • 
  Architect J.C. Schmeil of Merzbau Design Collective created this 4-bedroom, 4-bath house on Lake Austin in Texas, designed for a couple with three young children. Here's a view of the steel and glass master bedroom as it cantilevers over the patio and yard. You can see the cantilevered concrete patio in the foreground. The structure of the building is more common to commercial construction—steel framing with metal studs, storefront glass, and a concrete topping slab poured onto corrugated metal decking at the second floor. Photo by Brian Mihealsick.     This originally appeared in Lakeside House in Texas.

    Architect J.C. Schmeil of Merzbau Design Collective created this 4-bedroom, 4-bath house on Lake Austin in Texas, designed for a couple with three young children. Here's a view of the steel and glass master bedroom as it cantilevers over the patio and yard. You can see the cantilevered concrete patio in the foreground. The structure of the building is more common to commercial construction—steel framing with metal studs, storefront glass, and a concrete topping slab poured onto corrugated metal decking at the second floor. Photo by Brian Mihealsick. 

    This originally appeared in Lakeside House in Texas.
  • 
  A film writer and director asked Austin, Texas–based architect Henry Panton to build a bunkhouse with a huge screen porch for family and guests on his 40-acre property in Bastrop, Texas, about 30 miles outside Austin. Situated over a dry creek bed and carefully crafted around the existing loblolly pine trees, the bunkhouse “is sort of like a bridge into the woods,” says Panton. Photo by Greg Hursley.     This originally appeared in The Long Hall .

    A film writer and director asked Austin, Texas–based architect Henry Panton to build a bunkhouse with a huge screen porch for family and guests on his 40-acre property in Bastrop, Texas, about 30 miles outside Austin. Situated over a dry creek bed and carefully crafted around the existing loblolly pine trees, the bunkhouse “is sort of like a bridge into the woods,” says Panton. Photo by Greg Hursley. 

    This originally appeared in The Long Hall .
  • 
  Texas architect Jim Poteet helped Stacey Hill, who lives in a San Antonio artists’ community, wrangle an empty steel shipping container into a playhouse, a garden retreat and a guesthouse for visiting artists. The container measures a narrow and long 8 by 40 feet; Hill asked that a portion of the square footage be retained as a garden shed and the rest serve as the living space. Photo by Chris Cooper.   Photo by Chris Cooper.   This originally appeared in Smaller in Texas.

    Texas architect Jim Poteet helped Stacey Hill, who lives in a San Antonio artists’ community, wrangle an empty steel shipping container into a playhouse, a garden retreat and a guesthouse for visiting artists. The container measures a narrow and long 8 by 40 feet; Hill asked that a portion of the square footage be retained as a garden shed and the rest serve as the living space. Photo by Chris Cooper. 

    Photo by Chris Cooper.
    This originally appeared in Smaller in Texas.
  • 
  Austin-based architectural photographer Patrick Wong, who holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in architecture, asked the firm Cottam Hargrave for help in designing and building a live/work space on land he had purchased years ago from his grandfather. “The lot had become the neighborhood dump,” says Wong. Photo by Patrick Wong.   Photo by Patrick Wong. Courtesy of ©2009 Patrick Y. Wong
Copyright Case # 1-266025680 Filed October 27, 2009.  This originally appeared in Texas Two-Step.

    Austin-based architectural photographer Patrick Wong, who holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in architecture, asked the firm Cottam Hargrave for help in designing and building a live/work space on land he had purchased years ago from his grandfather. “The lot had become the neighborhood dump,” says Wong. Photo by Patrick Wong. 

    Photo by Patrick Wong. Courtesy of ©2009 Patrick Y. Wong Copyright Case # 1-266025680 Filed October 27, 2009.
    This originally appeared in Texas Two-Step.
  • 
  An entreprenurial pair of Belgian brothers land in one of Texas's few bohemian oases, become property owners, and find that sharing a house in adulthood isn't half bad. The Bercy residence seems to close the ever contentious gap between art and architecture. Says designer Thomas Bercy: “We tried to get the house to an artistic level, almost as if it were an installation as much as it was a house.” Photo by Denise Prince Martin.  Photo by Denise Prince Martin.   This originally appeared in Red, Wood, and Blue.

    An entreprenurial pair of Belgian brothers land in one of Texas's few bohemian oases, become property owners, and find that sharing a house in adulthood isn't half bad. The Bercy residence seems to close the ever contentious gap between art and architecture. Says designer Thomas Bercy: “We tried to get the house to an artistic level, almost as if it were an installation as much as it was a house.” Photo by Denise Prince Martin.

    Photo by Denise Prince Martin.
    This originally appeared in Red, Wood, and Blue.
  • 
  By taking advantage of economies of scale, a Houston native and a pair of mod-minded developers team up to create nine affordable row houses in the Houston Heights. Tina and Matthew Ford, here with daughter Daisy, are the owners of Shade House Development, the company that designed and is building the suite of houses that comprise Row on 25th in Houston, Texas. Photo by Jack Thompson.   Photo by Jack Thompson.   This originally appeared in Row on 25th: Affordable Housing Development in Houston.

    By taking advantage of economies of scale, a Houston native and a pair of mod-minded developers team up to create nine affordable row houses in the Houston Heights. Tina and Matthew Ford, here with daughter Daisy, are the owners of Shade House Development, the company that designed and is building the suite of houses that comprise Row on 25th in Houston, Texas. Photo by Jack Thompson. 

    Photo by Jack Thompson.
    This originally appeared in Row on 25th: Affordable Housing Development in Houston.
Previous Next
Slideshow loading...
@current / @total

You May Also Like

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...