7 Modern Homes in London

written by:
October 25, 2013
Amid its brick-clad row houses, London boasts some seriously modern architecture. Here are seven examples from the pages of Dwell.
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  Built by by architect David Adjaye, photographer Ed Reeve's Sunken House, in London’s De Beauvoir Town, is named for its excavated site in a stuffy part of town, where weathered brick and clay chimney pots are more common than modernist angles. Seen in the architectural context of its London neighborhood, the house is all the more extraordinary: compact, materially innovative, and easy on the eyes. Photo by Ed Reeve.  Photo by: Ed Reeve

    Built by by architect David Adjaye, photographer Ed Reeve's Sunken House, in London’s De Beauvoir Town, is named for its excavated site in a stuffy part of town, where weathered brick and clay chimney pots are more common than modernist angles. Seen in the architectural context of its London neighborhood, the house is all the more extraordinary: compact, materially innovative, and easy on the eyes. Photo by Ed Reeve.

    Photo by: Ed Reeve

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  Brod Hart’s home in London’s Finsbury Park neighborhood is hidden away on a quiet street filled with the typical Victorian houses that populate the area. But behind the large steel doors that shield it from view stands what once began as stables, and  was converted to a wheelchair-accessible private residence. Hart managed the renovation himself and lived on-site during the process. His clever DIY skills and design tricks paid off: The end result is an industrial-chic modern house, fully accessible to wheelchair users. The upstairs living room is an open plan social space, perfect for entertaining. Photo by Andrea Bakacs.  Photo by: Andrea Bakacs

    Brod Hart’s home in London’s Finsbury Park neighborhood is hidden away on a quiet street filled with the typical Victorian houses that populate the area. But behind the large steel doors that shield it from view stands what once began as stables, and  was converted to a wheelchair-accessible private residence. Hart managed the renovation himself and lived on-site during the process. His clever DIY skills and design tricks paid off: The end result is an industrial-chic modern house, fully accessible to wheelchair users. The upstairs living room is an open plan social space, perfect for entertaining. Photo by Andrea Bakacs.

    Photo by: Andrea Bakacs

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  Brad Smith’s compact former coach house, tucked away in one of London’s many hidden cobbled mews, was in need of a radical overhaul when his partner Brian Brennan moved in. Scape Architects remodeled inside and out to maximize both space and light, redesigning the property around the pair’s possessions and utilizing every available void for storage. Photo by Peter Marlow.  Photo by: Peter Marlow

    Brad Smith’s compact former coach house, tucked away in one of London’s many hidden cobbled mews, was in need of a radical overhaul when his partner Brian Brennan moved in. Scape Architects remodeled inside and out to maximize both space and light, redesigning the property around the pair’s possessions and utilizing every available void for storage. Photo by Peter Marlow.

    Photo by: Peter Marlow

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  Thanks to designers Nina Tolstrup and Jack Mama, an aging workshop in London’s once-gritty Bethnal Green is reborn as a colorful, custom-built guesthouse.   Photo by: Ben Anders

    Thanks to designers Nina Tolstrup and Jack Mama, an aging workshop in London’s once-gritty Bethnal Green is reborn as a colorful, custom-built guesthouse

    Photo by: Ben Anders

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  Textile designer Orla Kiely’s renovated London terrace house is punctuated by her distinctive palette and motifs. “I didn’t want to compromise the Victorian nature of the house,” she says. Although the original fireplace was in good shape, the flooring needed to be replaced. Kiely didn’t want to use new wood, so she sourced the weathered ebony-colored boards from an architectural salvage yard. Photo by Chris Tubbs.  Photo by: Chris Tubbs

    Textile designer Orla Kiely’s renovated London terrace house is punctuated by her distinctive palette and motifs. “I didn’t want to compromise the Victorian nature of the house,” she says. Although the original fireplace was in good shape, the flooring needed to be replaced. Kiely didn’t want to use new wood, so she sourced the weathered ebony-colored boards from an architectural salvage yard. Photo by Chris Tubbs.

    Photo by: Chris Tubbs

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  Artist Judith Brenner asked architect Gregory Phillips to connect a connect a double-fronted Victorian in Richmond, just outside of London, to a new modern extension that wouldn’t interfere with the surrounding houses. “I try to be true to the location,” explains Phillips, “so it doesn’t seem like some spaceship has landed.” Photo by Richard Powers.  Photo by: Richard Powers

    Artist Judith Brenner asked architect Gregory Phillips to connect a connect a double-fronted Victorian in Richmond, just outside of London, to a new modern extension that wouldn’t interfere with the surrounding houses. “I try to be true to the location,” explains Phillips, “so it doesn’t seem like some spaceship has landed.” Photo by Richard Powers.

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  Taking inspiration from barns, warehouses, Case Study Houses, and Japanese residential architecture, architect Marcus Lee and his wife, Rachel Hart—an architectural model maker—created a unique timber-framed home in Hackney, London. The three-story house sits at the end of a quiet London lane and politely turns its back on the workshops next door. Photo by Jeremy Murch.   Photo by: Jeremy Murch

    Taking inspiration from barns, warehouses, Case Study Houses, and Japanese residential architecture, architect Marcus Lee and his wife, Rachel Hart—an architectural model maker—created a unique timber-framed home in Hackney, London. The three-story house sits at the end of a quiet London lane and politely turns its back on the workshops next door. Photo by Jeremy Murch. 

    Photo by: Jeremy Murch

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