7 Modern Hamptons Homes

written by:
December 22, 2013
The Hamptons, at the eastern edge of Long Island, is known as a stylish outpost, so it's not surprising that it has its share notable houses. Here is a selection from Dwell's archives of midcentury marvels and modern houses of more recent vintage.
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  Designed by Resolution: 4 Architecture as a holiday retreat for a family of six, this  prefab beach house in East Hampton is up to the task of sheltering its owners and their guests. Photo by João Canziani.  Photo by: João Canziani

    Designed by Resolution: 4 Architecture as a holiday retreat for a family of six, this prefab beach house in East Hampton is up to the task of sheltering its owners and their guests. Photo by João Canziani.

    Photo by: João Canziani

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  When architect Nick Martin was hired to rework an art curator’s property in Amagansett, New York, into a Zen-like getaway from the big city, he took an appropriately holistic view. It’s the beach house that’s got it all: green technology; passive solar design; rich materials; an expansive feeling, despite a petite half-acre corner lot; and a design concept that references its humble beginnings as an off-the-rack kit house. Photo by Patrick Bernard.

    When architect Nick Martin was hired to rework an art curator’s property in Amagansett, New York, into a Zen-like getaway from the big city, he took an appropriately holistic view. It’s the beach house that’s got it all: green technology; passive solar design; rich materials; an expansive feeling, despite a petite half-acre corner lot; and a design concept that references its humble beginnings as an off-the-rack kit house. Photo by Patrick Bernard.

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  In 2005, Heide Banks and Howard Lazar traded their beach bungalow for something more unique: They became the first homeowners in the Houses at Sagaponac, a development that stirred up controversy among locals, summer people, and architecture buffs long before anything was built. The development sits on a woody parcel between the Montauk Highway and the East Hampton Airport, and is named for its neighborhood, Sagaponack (inexplicably dropping the k), New York. The Banks-Lazar residence, also known as Sagaponac House 43, was designed by the Iranian-born and U.S.-based architects (and sisters) Gisue and Mojgan Hariri, who signed on to the project in 1994. Photo by Paul Warchol.  Photo by: Paul Warchol

    In 2005, Heide Banks and Howard Lazar traded their beach bungalow for something more unique: They became the first homeowners in the Houses at Sagaponac, a development that stirred up controversy among locals, summer people, and architecture buffs long before anything was built. The development sits on a woody parcel between the Montauk Highway and the East Hampton Airport, and is named for its neighborhood, Sagaponack (inexplicably dropping the k), New York. The Banks-Lazar residence, also known as Sagaponac House 43, was designed by the Iranian-born and U.S.-based architects (and sisters) Gisue and Mojgan Hariri, who signed on to the project in 1994. Photo by Paul Warchol.

    Photo by: Paul Warchol

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  Charles Gwathmey’s residential masterpiece, a modest but pioneering home that he designed for his parents in the Amagansett, New York, looks as fresh today as it did in 1965. Photo by Norman McGrath.

    Charles Gwathmey’s residential masterpiece, a modest but pioneering home that he designed for his parents in the Amagansett, New York, looks as fresh today as it did in 1965. Photo by Norman McGrath.

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  Victoria and Greg Pryor met on the beach in Montauk, New York, when they were both just 13 years old. The Hamptons hamlet, the setting of so many idyllic childhood summers, continued to exert a strong pull on the couple into adulthood. So when they decided to build a modern retreat for escaping Manhattan’s bustle with their boys, Dylan and Lucas, it didn’t make sense to do it anywhere else. Photo by Ty Cole.  Photo by: Ty ColeCourtesy of: © TY COLE

    Victoria and Greg Pryor met on the beach in Montauk, New York, when they were both just 13 years old. The Hamptons hamlet, the setting of so many idyllic childhood summers, continued to exert a strong pull on the couple into adulthood. So when they decided to build a modern retreat for escaping Manhattan’s bustle with their boys, Dylan and Lucas, it didn’t make sense to do it anywhere else. Photo by Ty Cole.

    Photo by: Ty Cole

    Courtesy of: © TY COLE

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  Architect Page Goolrick helped Charlie and Rebecca Fisher renovate an aging, 1960s beach house in Amagansett, New York, turning it into . Photo by Richard Foulser.  Photo by: Richard Foulser

    Architect Page Goolrick helped Charlie and Rebecca Fisher renovate an aging, 1960s beach house in Amagansett, New York, turning it into . Photo by Richard Foulser.

    Photo by: Richard Foulser

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  Bates Masi’s renovation and expansion of Harry Bates’s 1967 house in Amagansett, New York, salvaged much of the home’s original cypress decking and incorporated subtle additions to the exterior. Because cypress quickly develops a patina, it was only a matter of weeks before the new facade matched the color of the original wood siding. Photo by Raimund Koch.  Photo by: Raimund Koch

    Bates Masi’s renovation and expansion of Harry Bates’s 1967 house in Amagansett, New York, salvaged much of the home’s original cypress decking and incorporated subtle additions to the exterior. Because cypress quickly develops a patina, it was only a matter of weeks before the new facade matched the color of the original wood siding. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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