7 Modern A-Frame Homes

written by:
November 13, 2013
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  For this tiny house in the Belgian forest, a little extra square footage comes in the form of a glassed-in addition with a stellar view. Adding 290 square feet to this already small (just 566 square feet) black A-frame in Brecht was all the local building ordinances allowed, but the architects at dmvA found that a single wing extended out to the side gave resident Rini van Beek all the storage and living space that she needs. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.   Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.   This originally appeared in A Modern Glass Addition in Belgium.

    For this tiny house in the Belgian forest, a little extra square footage comes in the form of a glassed-in addition with a stellar view. Adding 290 square feet to this already small (just 566 square feet) black A-frame in Brecht was all the local building ordinances allowed, but the architects at dmvA found that a single wing extended out to the side gave resident Rini van Beek all the storage and living space that she needs. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse. 

    Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.
    This originally appeared in A Modern Glass Addition in Belgium.
  • 
  Like a little chapel on the prairie, architect Jean-Baptiste Barache’s simply elegant retreat in the tiny Normandy town of Auvillier is a modern play on centuries-old forms and technology. The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade. Photo by Céline Clanet.   Photo by Céline Clanet.   This originally appeared in Modern Wooden A-Frame Retreat in France.

    Like a little chapel on the prairie, architect Jean-Baptiste Barache’s simply elegant retreat in the tiny Normandy town of Auvillier is a modern play on centuries-old forms and technology. The result: a house that looks like it’s just been dropped into a field, casual, with nary a path leading up to it and a front door that can barely be detected on the red-cedar-shingled facade. Photo by Céline Clanet. 

    Photo by Céline Clanet.
    This originally appeared in Modern Wooden A-Frame Retreat in France.
  • 
  The rear facade of the Barache house explodes into an expansive, glass-walled space. Photo by Céline Clanet.    This originally appeared in 10 Modern Gables.

    The rear facade of the Barache house explodes into an expansive, glass-walled space. Photo by Céline Clanet.

    This originally appeared in 10 Modern Gables.
  • 
  Yves Borghs and Katleen van Ammel wanted their new house in Belgium to offer maximum privacy but also maximum light. The solution proposed by Tom Verschueren, of Mechelen-based DMVA Architects, was to create a closed street-side facade with an open backside facing the garden, totally glazed from the ground up to the saddleback roof. It's a new take on the A-frame, rendered sideways.   Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.   This originally appeared in Facade Focus: Brick.

    Yves Borghs and Katleen van Ammel wanted their new house in Belgium to offer maximum privacy but also maximum light. The solution proposed by Tom Verschueren, of Mechelen-based DMVA Architects, was to create a closed street-side facade with an open backside facing the garden, totally glazed from the ground up to the saddleback roof. It's a new take on the A-frame, rendered sideways. 

    Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.
    This originally appeared in Facade Focus: Brick.
  • 
  Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage in Berlin, Germany, blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH
from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.     This originally appeared in Rock the Shack: Cabin Love.

    Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage in Berlin, Germany, blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH
from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013. 

    This originally appeared in Rock the Shack: Cabin Love.
  • 
  Updating the A-frame of yore, this home’s liberal use of windows makes the most of panoramic views spanning two valleys in Catalonia, Spain. Cadaval & Sola-Morales from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.     This originally appeared in Rock the Shack: Cabin Love.

    Updating the A-frame of yore, this home’s liberal use of windows makes the most of panoramic views spanning two valleys in Catalonia, Spain. Cadaval & Sola-Morales from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013. 

    This originally appeared in Rock the Shack: Cabin Love.
  • 
  Architect Preston Scott Cohen resurrected an early 1800s barn as a vacation home for a literary couple and their family in Pine Plains, New York, calling to mind both the agrarian spaciousness of the structure’s former life and the vernacular of its new function as a house. Transcending both, Cohen created a piece of architecture that is at once porous and opaque, familiar yet otherworldly. Photo by Raimund Koch.    This originally appeared in Organic Living .

    Architect Preston Scott Cohen resurrected an early 1800s barn as a vacation home for a literary couple and their family in Pine Plains, New York, calling to mind both the agrarian spaciousness of the structure’s former life and the vernacular of its new function as a house. Transcending both, Cohen created a piece of architecture that is at once porous and opaque, familiar yet otherworldly. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    This originally appeared in Organic Living .
  • 
  Designer Jens Risom returns to his 1967 prefab off the coast of Rhode Island, readying it for his family's next generation. A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog. Photo by Floto + Warner.   Photo by Floto + Warner.   This originally appeared in Jens Risom's Block Island Family Retreat.

    Designer Jens Risom returns to his 1967 prefab off the coast of Rhode Island, readying it for his family's next generation. A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog. Photo by Floto + Warner. 

    Photo by Floto + Warner.
    This originally appeared in Jens Risom's Block Island Family Retreat.
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