7 Cozy Scandinavian Abodes

written by:
January 3, 2014
The northeastern United States is experiencing the first winter storm of the year. On this snow day, take inspiration from Scandinavia, with minimal yet cozy cabins and interiors.
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  This summer house, renovated by Jonas Labbé and Johannes Schotanus of LASC for a family in Skåne, Sweden, is a great example of how strong design, thoughtfully placed bursts of strong color, and honest natural treatment can elevate even the simplest forms and materials. One large living and kitchen space that extends to a lounge occupies the first floor. The protruding storage box (upper left) marks the transition to the library corridor and vertically frames the living room. Photo by Thomas Ibsen.

    This summer house, renovated by Jonas Labbé and Johannes Schotanus of LASC for a family in Skåne, Sweden, is a great example of how strong design, thoughtfully placed bursts of strong color, and honest natural treatment can elevate even the simplest forms and materials. One large living and kitchen space that extends to a lounge occupies the first floor. The protruding storage box (upper left) marks the transition to the library corridor and vertically frames the living room. Photo by Thomas Ibsen.

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  As winter approaches, the light in Norway is cold and diffused by rain. The weather may be dismal here, but the Boxhome, which Norwegian artist and builder John Roger Holte helped build, gleams with optimism and modernity. The kitchen table, built into the structure of the house, includes two hot plates for cooking right at the table. A loft bed is directly overhead. Photo by Pia Ulin.  Photo by: Pia Ulin

    As winter approaches, the light in Norway is cold and diffused by rain. The weather may be dismal here, but the Boxhome, which Norwegian artist and builder John Roger Holte helped build, gleams with optimism and modernity. The kitchen table, built into the structure of the house, includes two hot plates for cooking right at the table. A loft bed is directly overhead. Photo by Pia Ulin.

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  Norwegian architecture firm Jarmund/Vigsnæs's Triangle House was completed in 2006, and its natural materials and geometric form equally embrace the surrounding forests and ocean. Image by Ivan Brodey. Photo by Pia Ulin.  Photo by: Pia Ulin

    Norwegian architecture firm Jarmund/Vigsnæs's Triangle House was completed in 2006, and its natural materials and geometric form equally embrace the surrounding forests and ocean. Image by Ivan Brodey. Photo by Pia Ulin.

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  A small prefab cabin in Norway designed by Oslo-based architect Marianne Borge is offering an alternative view on the concept of luxury. Named Woody35 because of its size and wooden structure, the main cabin can sleep six persons, has a living room, kitchen and bathroom. It is all fitted neatly together in a veneer-clad interior that allows simple and beautiful details to grasp the attention.

    A small prefab cabin in Norway designed by Oslo-based architect Marianne Borge is offering an alternative view on the concept of luxury. Named Woody35 because of its size and wooden structure, the main cabin can sleep six persons, has a living room, kitchen and bathroom. It is all fitted neatly together in a veneer-clad interior that allows simple and beautiful details to grasp the attention.

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  A 1960s artist’s retreat in southeastern Norway is recast as a 970-square-foot getaway for architect architect Irene Sævik. The interiors are clad in white-glazed pine, a contrast to the black-stained facade. The brick fireplace is original. Near a Polder sofa by Hella Jongerius for Vitra is a coffee table of Sævik’s design. Photo by Ivan Brodey.  Photo by: Ivan BrodeyCourtesy of: Ivan Brodey

    A 1960s artist’s retreat in southeastern Norway is recast as a 970-square-foot getaway for architect architect Irene Sævik. The interiors are clad in white-glazed pine, a contrast to the black-stained facade. The brick fireplace is original. Near a Polder sofa by Hella Jongerius for Vitra is a coffee table of Sævik’s design. Photo by Ivan Brodey.

    Photo by: Ivan Brodey

    Courtesy of: Ivan Brodey

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  In snowy Sweden, where pine planks and the democratic design incubator Ikea reign supreme, a local architect pays homage to his patrimony with a small, slatty home. The living room features an intriguing collection of furniture. The sofa is made by Swedish manufacturer Ire. The 1970s wood burner was a secondhand store find, and the wood table, by Bruno Mattson, was found in a bin at a recycling station. He inherited the lounge chair from his parents. Photo by Pia Ulin.  Photo by: Pia Ulin

    In snowy Sweden, where pine planks and the democratic design incubator Ikea reign supreme, a local architect pays homage to his patrimony with a small, slatty home. The living room features an intriguing collection of furniture. The sofa is made by Swedish manufacturer Ire. The 1970s wood burner was a secondhand store find, and the wood table, by Bruno Mattson, was found in a bin at a recycling station. He inherited the lounge chair from his parents. Photo by Pia Ulin.

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  Interior stylist Saša Antić renovated his tiny Stockholm, Sweden, apartment kitchen after living there for 15 years. The result is a fresh, clean rendition of Swedish functionalism with peppy blue cabinetry and an open feel. “I wanted it to be really graphic but quiet and beautiful,” he says. Photo by Jonas Ingerstedt.

    Interior stylist Saša Antić renovated his tiny Stockholm, Sweden, apartment kitchen after living there for 15 years. The result is a fresh, clean rendition of Swedish functionalism with peppy blue cabinetry and an open feel. “I wanted it to be really graphic but quiet and beautiful,” he says. Photo by Jonas Ingerstedt.

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