Advertising
Advertising

You are here

6 Tiny Texas Spaces

Read Article
Texas is famous for supersized everything, but these six buildings are daringly diminutive.
  • 
  Lauren Dolinsky’s petite flower shop is cozily housed in a renovated Airstream she found on Craigslist. 

    Lauren Dolinsky’s petite flower shop is cozily housed in a renovated Airstream she found on Craigslist. 

  • 
  In a family’s pint-size lake retreat in Austin, Texas, ipe siding and decking meet concrete floors and steel-and-glass windows. Stained cyprus was used for the ceiling and soffit. The custom barn-style sliding door conceals the family’s collection of giant inner tubes and other boating equipment. Photo by Kimberly Davis.

    In a family’s pint-size lake retreat in Austin, Texas, ipe siding and decking meet concrete floors and steel-and-glass windows. Stained cyprus was used for the ceiling and soffit. The custom barn-style sliding door conceals the family’s collection of giant inner tubes and other boating equipment. Photo by Kimberly Davis.

  • 
  Designed as a prefabricated monolithic steel grid, this Texas boathouse’s orthogonal frame was delivered from Houston by truck and then transported by barge to the site. But the structure does more than house a boat. Just 400 square feet on each level and furnished with comfy chairs, it’s both a playhouse and a retreat—and it’s off the grid. Photo by Paul Bardagjy.  Photo by: Paul Bardagjy Courtesy of: Paul Bardagjy

    Designed as a prefabricated monolithic steel grid, this Texas boathouse’s orthogonal frame was delivered from Houston by truck and then transported by barge to the site. But the structure does more than house a boat. Just 400 square feet on each level and furnished with comfy chairs, it’s both a playhouse and a retreat—and it’s off the grid. Photo by Paul Bardagjy.

    Photo by: Paul Bardagjy

    Courtesy of: Paul Bardagjy

  • 
  Recent grad Blake Dollahite and his father spent Blake’s first year out of college renovating a rundown bungalow in Austin, Texas. Almost every element of the interior—from the kitchen cabinetry to the art on the walls—was created by Dollahite himself. Photo by Misty Keasler.  Photo by: Misty Keasler

    Recent grad Blake Dollahite and his father spent Blake’s first year out of college renovating a rundown bungalow in Austin, Texas. Almost every element of the interior—from the kitchen cabinetry to the art on the walls—was created by Dollahite himself. Photo by Misty Keasler.

    Photo by: Misty Keasler

  • 
  The 980 square feet of Blake Trabulsi and Allison Orr’s Austin, Texas, bungalow is so comfortable that their biggest issue is getting guests to go home. “We talked about a two-story addition. But it would have been way out of our budget, and it would have overwhelmed the existing house. We figured out early on that we didn’t want to build something so large that the old spaces wouldn’t be used,” Trabulsi says.   Photo by: Jack Thompson

    The 980 square feet of Blake Trabulsi and Allison Orr’s Austin, Texas, bungalow is so comfortable that their biggest issue is getting guests to go home. “We talked about a two-story addition. But it would have been way out of our budget, and it would have overwhelmed the existing house. We figured out early on that we didn’t want to build something so large that the old spaces wouldn’t be used,” Trabulsi says. 

    Photo by: Jack Thompson

  • 
  Texas architect Jim Poteet helped Stacey Hill, who lives in a San Antonio artists’ community, wrangle an empty steel shipping container into a playhouse, a garden retreat, and a guesthouse for visiting artists. Jon Ahrens of Madrone Landscaping, who layed out the plantings around the container, implemented a green roof on a drip watering system. The cantilevered overhang at rear is planted with cacti. Photo by Chris Cooper.  Photo by: Chris Cooper

    Texas architect Jim Poteet helped Stacey Hill, who lives in a San Antonio artists’ community, wrangle an empty steel shipping container into a playhouse, a garden retreat, and a guesthouse for visiting artists. Jon Ahrens of Madrone Landscaping, who layed out the plantings around the container, implemented a green roof on a drip watering system. The cantilevered overhang at rear is planted with cacti. Photo by Chris Cooper.

    Photo by: Chris Cooper

@current / @total

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising