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November 17, 2014
From a modernist icon to a New Jersey prefab, these six projects show that a body of water does a structure good.
modern lakeside home in Australia with teak facade

This family home on Australia’s Mornington Peninsula is built to blend in with its lakeside setting. Part of it cantilevers over the water. “We deliberately chose to keep the design restrained, as the natural setting here is the highlight,” says architect Karen Alcock.

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Originally appeared in Living Simply on a Lush Australian Estate
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modern sturgeon bay julie brogan wisconsin glass corridor courtyard

After a devastating fire, architect David Salmela designs a house to replace a beloved lakeside retreat in Wisconsin. “This is the place where I want to create new memories with my family,” resident Julie Brogan says, pointing to the view of Lake Michigan from her bedroom window in Sturgeon Bay, a small town in Wisconsin’s Door County.

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Originally appeared in A Modern Lakeside Home in Wisconsin
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Modern prefab lakeside home in Bloomingdale, New Jersey

A New Zealand expat and her son use their prefabricated lakeside New Jersey retreat as an outdoorsy counterpoint to city life. "We used every inch of glass allowable under code!" says resident Debbi Gibbs. "The reason we came here is the outdoors, and the house is designed so that the outside is an extension of the inside. It flows, and it’s very permeable, unless you want the protection of closed doors."

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Courtesy of 
photograph by Mark Mahaney,all rights reserved
Originally appeared in A Lakeside Prefab in New Jersey
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In a family’s pint-size lake retreat in Austin, Texas, ipe siding and decking meet concrete floors and steeland-glass windows. Stained cyprus was used for the ceiling and soffit. The custom barn-style sliding door conceals the family’s collection of giant inner tubes and other boating equipment. Photo by: Kimberly Davis

Originally appeared in Small and Modern: A Family Lakeside Getaway in Texas
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Modern boathouse interior with wood floor and steel ribs

The Houdini-like designers behind this boathouse employed giant steel arches to make the structure disappear from view and in its place create the illusion of a gentle slope of land leading out to the lake.

Originally appeared in About a Boat
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An exterior view of the roof deck and view of Lake Michigan from the Douglas House.

Richard Meier designed the Douglas House for a challenging site overlooking Lake Michigan. “It was very private and completely covered in trees—from the road you could see the lake. No one else could figure out how to build there,” Meier recalls. “It took me quite a while to do it.”

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© Dean Kaufman 2011 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Originally appeared in On the Waterfront
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modern lakeside home in Australia with teak facade

This family home on Australia’s Mornington Peninsula is built to blend in with its lakeside setting. Part of it cantilevers over the water. “We deliberately chose to keep the design restrained, as the natural setting here is the highlight,” says architect Karen Alcock.

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