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6 Modern Homes in Norway

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It must be the chill in the air that has us thinking of Norway—lovely, freezing Norway. Here are six modern houses that make the place look downright cozy.
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  In October, the light in Norway is cold and diffused by rain. It's "our worst month," says John Roger Holte, a Norwegian artist and builder. The weather may be dismal here, but the Boxhome, which Holte helped build, gleams with optimism and modernity. The kitchen table, built into the structure of the house, includes two hot plates. Rintala says these were inspired by the Korean way of cooking: Residents and guests will cook their own food at the table. Photo by Pia Ulin.   Photo by: Pia Ulin

    In October, the light in Norway is cold and diffused by rain. It's "our worst month," says John Roger Holte, a Norwegian artist and builder. The weather may be dismal here, but the Boxhome, which Holte helped build, gleams with optimism and modernity. The kitchen table, built into the structure of the house, includes two hot plates. Rintala says these were inspired by the Korean way of cooking: Residents and guests will cook their own food at the table. Photo by Pia Ulin. 

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  A small prefab cabin in Norway is offering an alternative view on the concept of luxury. Woody35's distinct shape makes it stand out from its surroundings despite the modest size of the building.

    A small prefab cabin in Norway is offering an alternative view on the concept of luxury. Woody35's distinct shape makes it stand out from its surroundings despite the modest size of the building.

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  Inside, Woody35's living room area opens up to the surroundings. Walls and ceiling are clad in birch veneer while the floor is in solid birch. 

    Inside, Woody35's living room area opens up to the surroundings. Walls and ceiling are clad in birch veneer while the floor is in solid birch. 

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  Cabin Nordmarka, 2006, by Jarmund/Vigsnæs. Image by Nils Petter Dale. Photo by Pia Ulin.   Photo by: Pia Ulin

    Cabin Nordmarka, 2006, by Jarmund/Vigsnæs. Image by Nils Petter Dale. Photo by Pia Ulin. 

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  As Jarmund/Vigsnæs’s growing crop of small, smart houses have garnered increasing attention, their equally prolific civic works have them poised to be Norway’s next big export. The double-height ceiling and knotty interior give the Cabin Nordmarka a pleasant lightness, despite being situated deep in the Norwegian forest. Photo by Nils Petter Dale. Photo by Pia Ulin.   Photo by: Pia Ulin

    As Jarmund/Vigsnæs’s growing crop of small, smart houses have garnered increasing attention, their equally prolific civic works have them poised to be Norway’s next big export. The double-height ceiling and knotty interior give the Cabin Nordmarka a pleasant lightness, despite being situated deep in the Norwegian forest. Photo by Nils Petter Dale. Photo by Pia Ulin. 

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  The Red House, 2002, by Jarmund/Vigsnæs. Photo by Nils Petter Dale. Photo by Pia Ulin.  Photo by: Pia Ulin

    The Red House, 2002, by Jarmund/Vigsnæs. Photo by Nils Petter Dale. Photo by Pia Ulin.

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  On Hanko, an island 60 miles south of Oslo, Kari K. Holm and her husband, German-born architect Jürgen Kiehl, built a house on a remote, exposed piece of land, where the tree line abruptly ends and nothing obstructs the open view. Photo by Pia Ulin.  Photo by: Pia Ulin

    On Hanko, an island 60 miles south of Oslo, Kari K. Holm and her husband, German-born architect Jürgen Kiehl, built a house on a remote, exposed piece of land, where the tree line abruptly ends and nothing obstructs the open view. Photo by Pia Ulin.

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  An architect recasts a 1960s artist’s retreat in southeastern Norway. The 1950s desk in the office is from the original house; the chair is by Aksel, a Norwegian furniture company. Photo by Ivan Brodey.   Photo by: Ivan BrodeyCourtesy of: Ivan Brodey

    An architect recasts a 1960s artist’s retreat in southeastern Norway. The 1950s desk in the office is from the original house; the chair is by Aksel, a Norwegian furniture company. Photo by Ivan Brodey. 

    Photo by: Ivan Brodey

    Courtesy of: Ivan Brodey

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