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6 Modern Homes in Connecticut

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Although New Canaan gets the award for modernism in Connecticut (Breuer, Johnson...), the Constitution State has been known to welcome other forms of modern architectural experimentation. Here are a few examples from Dwell’s pages.
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  To create their rural Connecticut getaway, Lisa Gray and Alan Organschi layered their modern design sensibility atop an early 20th-century stone foundation. Consisting of two barnlike volumes set atop a stone foundation, the Depot House offers a locally rooted vision of New England modernism. Photo by Andrea Chu.

    To create their rural Connecticut getaway, Lisa Gray and Alan Organschi layered their modern design sensibility atop an early 20th-century stone foundation. Consisting of two barnlike volumes set atop a stone foundation, the Depot House offers a locally rooted vision of New England modernism. Photo by Andrea Chu.

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  The Depot House swimming pool offers an alternative plunge to the nearby Bantam River. Photo by Andrea Chu.   Photo by: Andrea Chu

    The Depot House swimming pool offers an alternative plunge to the nearby Bantam River. Photo by Andrea Chu. 

    Photo by: Andrea Chu

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  Suzanne and Brooks Kelley at the back of their 1,100-square-foot guest cottage in Guilford, Connecticut, reworked by Gray Organschi Architecture. The house sits atop a 3.5-acre gently sloping lawn speckled with granite outcroppings and large oak trees overlooking Long Island Sound. Photo by Mark Mahaney.  Photo by: Mark Mahaney

    Suzanne and Brooks Kelley at the back of their 1,100-square-foot guest cottage in Guilford, Connecticut, reworked by Gray Organschi Architecture. The house sits atop a 3.5-acre gently sloping lawn speckled with granite outcroppings and large oak trees overlooking Long Island Sound. Photo by Mark Mahaney.

    Photo by: Mark Mahaney

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  In Guilford, Connecticut, residents Suzanne and Brooks Kelley furnished the glass-walled living room of their cottage with an array of classic items paired with minimalist contemporary pieces, all in a soothing mix of neutral hues. Photo by Mark Mahaney.   Photo by: Mark Mahaney

    In Guilford, Connecticut, residents Suzanne and Brooks Kelley furnished the glass-walled living room of their cottage with an array of classic items paired with minimalist contemporary pieces, all in a soothing mix of neutral hues. Photo by Mark Mahaney. 

    Photo by: Mark Mahaney

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  Craig Bassam (left) and Scott Fellows hung redwood garage doors that match the exterior of their house in New Canaan. Photo by Mark Seelen.   Photo by: Mark Seelen

    Craig Bassam (left) and Scott Fellows hung redwood garage doors that match the exterior of their house in New Canaan. Photo by Mark Seelen. 

    Photo by: Mark Seelen

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  At the Bassam-Fellows house, the second-floor bridge that leads to the front door flows from the outside in. “Tractor seat” stools designed by Bassam perch on a floor of pristine white terrazzo. Photo by Mark Seelen.   Photo by: Mark Seelen

    At the Bassam-Fellows house, the second-floor bridge that leads to the front door flows from the outside in. “Tractor seat” stools designed by Bassam perch on a floor of pristine white terrazzo. Photo by Mark Seelen. 

    Photo by: Mark Seelen

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  Gray Organschi renovated a church in Greenwich, Connecticut, for Santiago Suarez and his wife, Bonnie. The undulating white-cedar door is a replica of one Santiago admired at a sushi bar in Japan. Photo by Juliana Sohn.   Photo by: Juliana Sohn

    Gray Organschi renovated a church in Greenwich, Connecticut, for Santiago Suarez and his wife, Bonnie. The undulating white-cedar door is a replica of one Santiago admired at a sushi bar in Japan. Photo by Juliana Sohn. 

    Photo by: Juliana Sohn

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  With a free-floating birch pod defining the space, and the massive Venetian chandelier accentuating the volume, the great room is, indeed, great. The Suarezes wanted the living area to be a place where the family could be occupied individually while still together. Photo by Juliana Sohn.   Photo by: Juliana Sohn

    With a free-floating birch pod defining the space, and the massive Venetian chandelier accentuating the volume, the great room is, indeed, great. The Suarezes wanted the living area to be a place where the family could be occupied individually while still together. Photo by Juliana Sohn. 

    Photo by: Juliana Sohn

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  The house that started it all: Philip Johnson's Glass House in New Canaan. He and David Whitney used to invite great minds from the architecture, design, and art worlds to the house for evenings of discussion and debate. When the Glass House opened to the public in 2007, its programmers continued the invite-only tradition. 

    The house that started it all: Philip Johnson's Glass House in New Canaan. He and David Whitney used to invite great minds from the architecture, design, and art worlds to the house for evenings of discussion and debate. When the Glass House opened to the public in 2007, its programmers continued the invite-only tradition. 

  • 
  A sibling of Johnson's Glass House is the Breuer-Robeck House, a privately owned historic property in New Canaan, designed by noted modern architect and furniture designer Marcel Breuer. 
    A sibling of Johnson's Glass House is the Breuer-Robeck House, a privately owned historic property in New Canaan, designed by noted modern architect and furniture designer Marcel Breuer.

     

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