5 Striking Dining Spaces

written by:
October 5, 2013
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  In an up-and-coming area of Copenhagen, a pair of designers and their twin girls inhabit a converted loft, filling it with serious design savvy and a hefty dose of creativity. Photo by Anders Hviid

    In an up-and-coming area of Copenhagen, a pair of designers and their twin girls inhabit a converted loft, filling it with serious design savvy and a hefty dose of creativity. Photo by Anders Hviid

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  Ludovica Serafini and Roberto Palomba, who work as Ludovica+Roberto Palomba, commissioned a dining table of their own design from Exteta and paired it with Abanica chairs by Oscar Tusquets for Driade.

    Ludovica Serafini and Roberto Palomba, who work as Ludovica+Roberto Palomba, commissioned a dining table of their own design from Exteta and paired it with Abanica chairs by Oscar Tusquets for Driade.

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  Visitors pass by a sentry wall of lamps from Design House Stockholm on their way to the airy living-dining room with its 52 windows. Photo by Wichmann + Bendtsen

    Visitors pass by a sentry wall of lamps from Design House Stockholm on their way to the airy living-dining room with its 52 windows. Photo by Wichmann + Bendtsen

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  The home’s informal dining space has a slightly rustic feel, sporting bronze and wood in the form of a Lindsey Adams Adelman chandelier for Roll & Hill and a table by Terry Dwan, mixed with folk-art touches like the Eames House Birds and a cuckoo clock from Diamantini & Domeniconi. Photo by Gregory Miller

    The home’s informal dining space has a slightly rustic feel, sporting bronze and wood in the form of a Lindsey Adams Adelman chandelier for Roll & Hill and a table by Terry Dwan, mixed with folk-art touches like the Eames House Birds and a cuckoo clock from Diamantini & Domeniconi. Photo by Gregory Miller

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  Inspired by an apartment created in the 1930s by Le Corbusier, architect Michael Herrman renovated an 18th-century structure in Paris for himself and his family. Photo by Filippo Bamberghi

    Inspired by an apartment created in the 1930s by Le Corbusier, architect Michael Herrman renovated an 18th-century structure in Paris for himself and his family. Photo by Filippo Bamberghi

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