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5 Breathtakingly Modern House Additions

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These five modern house additions not only add necessary square footage, but bring their previously existing structures thoroughly up to date.
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  Architect Piers Taylor's Moonshine house is beautifully set in an isolated spot in the English countryside outside of Bath. The dramatic juxtaposition of a stone gamekeeper's cottage and a modern timber framed addition gives the home a quaint, pastoral feel while capitalizing on the dramatic view of St. Catherine's Valley. Photo by Ben Anders.  Photo by: Ben Anders

    Architect Piers Taylor's Moonshine house is beautifully set in an isolated spot in the English countryside outside of Bath. The dramatic juxtaposition of a stone gamekeeper's cottage and a modern timber framed addition gives the home a quaint, pastoral feel while capitalizing on the dramatic view of St. Catherine's Valley. Photo by Ben Anders.

    Photo by: Ben Anders

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  This surprisingly modern addition transformed an 1880 bungalow in Adelaide, Australia, into a spacious and sensuous abode. Photo by James Knowler.   Photo by: James KnowlerCourtesy of: James Knowler Photography

    This surprisingly modern addition transformed an 1880 bungalow in Adelaide, Australia, into a spacious and sensuous abode. Photo by James Knowler.

     

    Photo by: James Knowler

    Courtesy of: James Knowler Photography

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  Since this house is in a historic district in Boise, Idaho, Beebe and Skidmore’s interventions were constrained by local guidelines, including a stipulation that the walls of the addition couldn’t line up with the walls of the existing house. They bumped the walls in by five feet on either side and painted the addition, clad in siding from Capital Lumber, a color complementary to the original building’s deep, bright blue. “A guy from Boise’s preservation office came by and said, ‘This is a perfect example of how we’d like people to build additions,’” says Dana. “We were pretty proud of that.” Photo by Lincoln Barbour.  Photo by: Lincoln BarbourCourtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

    Since this house is in a historic district in Boise, Idaho, Beebe and Skidmore’s interventions were constrained by local guidelines, including a stipulation that the walls of the addition couldn’t line up with the walls of the existing house. They bumped the walls in by five feet on either side and painted the addition, clad in siding from Capital Lumber, a color complementary to the original building’s deep, bright blue. “A guy from Boise’s preservation office came by and said, ‘This is a perfect example of how we’d like people to build additions,’” says Dana. “We were pretty proud of that.” Photo by Lincoln Barbour.

    Photo by: Lincoln Barbour

    Courtesy of: ©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved

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  Have you ever walked past a house on your way to work and thought, Wouldn’t it be nice to live there. Artist Judith Brenner did. But unlike most of us, Judith loved the house so much that, in July 2002, she and her husband, Jonathan, took things a step further by phoning the owners and making an offer. Before they knew it, the Brenners were holding the keys to the front door, and moving their three young children into the double-fronted Victorian in Richmond, just outside of London. Architect Gregory Phillips connected the original house to a new modern extension that doesn’t interfere with the surrounding houses. “I try to be true to the location,” he explains, “so it doesn’t seem like some spaceship has landed.” Photo by Richard Powers.   Photo by: Richard Powers
    Have you ever walked past a house on your way to work and thought, Wouldn’t it be nice to live there. Artist Judith Brenner did. But unlike most of us, Judith loved the house so much that, in July 2002, she and her husband, Jonathan, took things a step further by phoning the owners and making an offer. Before they knew it, the Brenners were holding the keys to the front door, and moving their three young children into the double-fronted Victorian in Richmond, just outside of London. Architect Gregory Phillips connected the original house to a new modern extension that doesn’t interfere with the surrounding houses. “I try to be true to the location,” he explains, “so it doesn’t seem like some spaceship has landed.” Photo by Richard Powers.

     

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  With the addition of two small boys and demanding jobs, this couple in London craved order, light, and space but were prepared to settle for a washing machine. In came architect William Tozer with a plan that inserted clean white planes into the envelope of their Victorian terrace house in London. This renovation collates Tozer’s decade of experience making small partial renovations into a complete overhaul that builds on, rather than obliterates, its Victorian origins. Photo by Matthew Williams.

    With the addition of two small boys and demanding jobs, this couple in London craved order, light, and space but were prepared to settle for a washing machine. In came architect William Tozer with a plan that inserted clean white planes into the envelope of their Victorian terrace house in London. This renovation collates Tozer’s decade of experience making small partial renovations into a complete overhaul that builds on, rather than obliterates, its Victorian origins. Photo by Matthew Williams.

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