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10 Charming Farmhouses Around the Globe

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Set in ranging landscapes from Alaska to Sweden, Dwell takes a look at 10 modern cottages built on rural terrain around the world.
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  For this rural Ontario home, building sustainably was less about high-tech gizmos than learning to truly love the land. The long gangplank of a deck runs right out into the fields, a fact that Treanor relishes. Photo by Derek Shapton.  Photo by: Derek ShaptonCourtesy of: Derek Shapton

    For this rural Ontario home, building sustainably was less about high-tech gizmos than learning to truly love the land. The long gangplank of a deck runs right out into the fields, a fact that Treanor relishes. Photo by Derek Shapton.

    Photo by: Derek Shapton

    Courtesy of: Derek Shapton

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  Taking its cues from local barns and silos and the rolling Wisconsin terrain, the Field House is a kind of modern observatory for watching winter turn to spring and the great vault of the heavens. Photo by Tom Fowlks.  Photo by: Tom Fowlks

    Taking its cues from local barns and silos and the rolling Wisconsin terrain, the Field House is a kind of modern observatory for watching winter turn to spring and the great vault of the heavens. Photo by Tom Fowlks.

    Photo by: Tom Fowlks

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  In the shadow of Mount McKinley, amid Alaska’s meadows and icy streams, a former teacher and a four-time Iditarod winner built a modernist cabin as expansive as the Last Frontier. Photo by Kamil Bialous.  Photo by: Kamil Bialous

    In the shadow of Mount McKinley, amid Alaska’s meadows and icy streams, a former teacher and a four-time Iditarod winner built a modernist cabin as expansive as the Last Frontier. Photo by Kamil Bialous.

    Photo by: Kamil Bialous

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  Designer Jens Risom returns to his 1967 prefab off the coast of Rhode Island, readying it for his family's next generation. Photo by Floto + Warner.  Photo by: Floto + Warner

    Designer Jens Risom returns to his 1967 prefab off the coast of Rhode Island, readying it for his family's next generation. Photo by Floto + Warner.

    Photo by: Floto + Warner

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  Taking a calculated turn from tradition, two Czech architects designed a modern rendition of a classic Bohemian home, powered by solar panels and a geothermal heat pump that draws energy from the ground itself, 300 feet underground. Photo by Andrea Lhotakova.  Photo by: Andrea Lhotakova

    Taking a calculated turn from tradition, two Czech architects designed a modern rendition of a classic Bohemian home, powered by solar panels and a geothermal heat pump that draws energy from the ground itself, 300 feet underground. Photo by Andrea Lhotakova.

    Photo by: Andrea Lhotakova

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  Nestled in a field of praire grass in the Wisconsin woods, the Weekn’der is a dynamic contrast of minimalist black and white. Charlie Lazor's design consists of two prefab modules bookending a central stick-built home. Photo by George Heinrich.

    Nestled in a field of praire grass in the Wisconsin woods, the Weekn’der is a dynamic contrast of minimalist black and white. Charlie Lazor's design consists of two prefab modules bookending a central stick-built home. Photo by George Heinrich.

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  On an 18th-century farmstead in rural Sweden, two Copenhagen designers handcraft a summerhouse that seamlessly melds the modern and the traditional. Photo by Åke E:son Lindman.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

    On an 18th-century farmstead in rural Sweden, two Copenhagen designers handcraft a summerhouse that seamlessly melds the modern and the traditional. Photo by Åke E:son Lindman.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  Canada's Magdalen Islands offer a seaside retreat to landlocked Quebecers, two of whom have turned the local vernacular on its oreille with a winsome vacation home. Photo by Matthew Monteith.  Photo by: Matthew Monteith

    Canada's Magdalen Islands offer a seaside retreat to landlocked Quebecers, two of whom have turned the local vernacular on its oreille with a winsome vacation home. Photo by Matthew Monteith.

    Photo by: Matthew Monteith

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  The Pine Plains, New York, home of Elise and Arnold Goodman boasts 48 windows, the largest of which measures 8'6'' by 7'6''. As architect Preston Scott Cohen explains, the "free facade makes it impossible to identify how many levels there are, or even to tell the difference between a door and a window." From without, the windows reveal dramatic glimpses of the 18th-century barn farm and new steel structure that support the house. From within, says Elise, "Each season, each time of day, offers a different view of the world. It's spectacular." Photo by Raimund Koch.

    The Pine Plains, New York, home of Elise and Arnold Goodman boasts 48 windows, the largest of which measures 8'6'' by 7'6''. As architect Preston Scott Cohen explains, the "free facade makes it impossible to identify how many levels there are, or even to tell the difference between a door and a window." From without, the windows reveal dramatic glimpses of the 18th-century barn farm and new steel structure that support the house. From within, says Elise, "Each season, each time of day, offers a different view of the world. It's spectacular." Photo by Raimund Koch.

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  On the shores of New Zealand’s Lake Wakatipu, architects Bronwen Kerr and Pete Ritchie designed a relaxed family home that reclines into its spectacular landscape. Photo by Stephen Oxenbury.  Photo by: Stephen Oxenbury

    On the shores of New Zealand’s Lake Wakatipu, architects Bronwen Kerr and Pete Ritchie designed a relaxed family home that reclines into its spectacular landscape. Photo by Stephen Oxenbury.

    Photo by: Stephen Oxenbury

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