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September 18, 2013
Ciao! Grab some gnocchi and gelato as we prepare to take you on a tour of these striking homes residing in Italy.
Italian slate floors metal zig-zag stairs

A couple in northern Italy trade a cramped flat for a renovated farmhouse in the country.

Photo by: Helenio Barbetta

Read the entire article here. 

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Originally appeared in A Renovated Farmhouse in Northern Italy
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Modern office space Eames lounge chair

 

The sitting area and office are on the second floor, reached via the catwalk. Near the sofa by Piero Lissoni for Cassina is a Bourgie lamp from Kartell; on the large table, made from old roof beams, is a Taccia lamp from Flos.

Photo by: Helenio Barbetta

Read the entire article here. 

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Originally appeared in A Renovated Farmhouse in Northern Italy
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Black and white minimalist dining area renovation

 

In the dining area a vintage table from a shop in Barcelona is surrounded by Giandomenico Belotti Spaghetti chairs. The space, which also includes the kitchen, occupies a 1970s addition.

Photo by: Helenio Barbetta

Read the entire article here. 

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Originally appeared in A Renovated Farmhouse in Northern Italy
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This 1930s farmhouse on the coast of Tuscany is sited on a podere, land claimed from the low-lying salt marshes by the Fascist government in the early decades of the 20th century. The Dutch technique of “podering” the landscape refers to the process of cr

A complex of farm buildings from a less than glorious period in Italy’s history is magically transformed. The result? A sophis­ticated yet kid-friendly retreat that seamlessly fuses historical influences with contemporary design.

Photo by: Jacob Langvad

Read the entire article here.

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Originally appeared in Somewhere Under the Tuscan Sun
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Though it’s inside, this light-filled room allows for a nearly alfresco dining experience. 
The Fucsia pendant lamps are by Achille Castiglioni. The couch in the living area is by Antonio Citterio.

Though it’s inside, this light-filled room allows for a nearly alfresco dining experience. The Fucsia pendant lamps are by Achille Castiglioni. The couch in the living area is by Antonio Citterio.

Photo by: Jacob Langvad

Read the entire article here.

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Originally appeared in Somewhere Under the Tuscan Sun
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White dining room w/ wooden and wicker furniture.

The acclaimed Italian designers Ludovica+Roberto Palomba carve a serene retreat out of a 17th-century oil mill in Salento, filling it with custom creations and their greatest hits.

Photo by: Francesco Bolis

Read the entire article here.

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Originally appeared in Modern Meets Ancient in a Renovated Italian Vacation Home
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Modern courtyard in Italy.

The indoor-outdoor Grand Plié sofa and Piaffé table, which the couple designed for Driade, perfectly suit the whitewashed courtyard, with curving silhouettes that echo the surrounding stonework. Serafini and Palomba purchased the metal lanterns at a local market.

Photo by: Francesco Bolis

Read the entire article here.

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Originally appeared in Modern Meets Ancient in a Renovated Italian Vacation Home
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Palomba residence master bedroom

 

The house gracefully marries modern and ancient, as seen in the master bedroom, where a custom-built mirrored storage unit divides the sleeping and bathing areas.

Photo by: Francesco Bolis

Read the entire article here.

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Originally appeared in Modern Meets Ancient in a Renovated Italian Vacation Home
8 / 9
sesto, italy, apartment building, plasma studio

Perched in the Dolomite mountains, an angular copper-clad apartment building echoes the topography of its site.

Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

Read the entire article here.

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Originally appeared in An Angular Copper-Clad Apartment Building in Italy
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Italian slate floors metal zig-zag stairs

A couple in northern Italy trade a cramped flat for a renovated farmhouse in the country.

Photo by: Helenio Barbetta

Read the entire article here. 

Photo by Helenio Barbetta.

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