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August 5, 2014
From a prefab tree house to a converted dairy, these six structures serve one purpose and one purpose only: as places to play.
Freestanding treehouse in Garrison, New York

In Garrison, New York, architectural designer Sharon Davis crafted this 17-foot-tall freestanding play structure when a good tree proved hard to find. A deep bed of wood chips and railing make for safe play

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Originally appeared in Kid-Friendly Treehouse in Upstate New York
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Josie’s tepee playhouse stands on a platform, where she and her friends erect sets for their theatrical productions.

Sometimes, simpler is better, and this teepee playhouse in the backyard of an architect’s home in Los Angeles stands on a platform that doubles as a theatrical stage.

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Originally appeared in Compound Addition
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modern landscaping backyard metapod laminate floors desk sleeping loft

An artist built a 125-square-foot play structure for his three children to restore a sense of magic that modern life has lost. “We live in a world of simulations, of shadows, of media—not of reality,” he says. Dubbed, the “Metapod” it was inspired by a large pane of salvaged glass, which is now oriented to the west for maximum sunset viewing during sleepovers. 

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Originally appeared in Tiny Garden Retreat on New York's Long Island
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New Zealand backyard playhouse plywood and plastic

Inspired by Case Study houses and toy building blocks, New Zealand architect Marc Lithgow created a playhouse for his two sons. At six by four feet it is big enough to lay down in and ideal for midday naps.

 

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Originally appeared in Modular Backyard Playhouse in New Zealand
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Danish furniture and product designer Nina Tolstrup, who works under the name Studiomama, conceived a huge, freestanding medium-density fiberboard (MDF) cube punctured with circular windows that acts as her children’s playroom inside her London home. <a h

Danish furniture and product designer Nina Tolstrup, who works under the name Studiomama, conceived a huge, freestanding medium-density fiberboard (MDF) cube punctured with circular windows that acts as her children’s playroom inside her London home.

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Ben Anders
Originally appeared in A Look at Playrooms
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An old loft leftover from architect John Tong’s Toronto home’s origins as a dairy will one day become a tree house for the kids, but for now it doubles as an awning and threshold for swings. 

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Originally appeared in Play's the Thing
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Freestanding treehouse in Garrison, New York

In Garrison, New York, architectural designer Sharon Davis crafted this 17-foot-tall freestanding play structure when a good tree proved hard to find. A deep bed of wood chips and railing make for safe play

Photo by Elizabeth Felicella.

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