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November 26, 2013
From a warm slab countertop to a modern dining table and chairs, we love homes that customize their interiors with walnut accents.
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  In the ground-floor eating area, the design team wrapped the walls in rich walnut to instill warmth often found in mid-century homes. “Sometimes one bold move is enough. Be brave with fewer statements,” Kiely advises. “Go for the big thing rather than lots of little things.” Kiely’s Upholstered Dining Chairs from her House collection surround a Danish vintage dining table. Her Gloss vases adorn the hallway console, which is also from her House line. Photo by Chris Tubbs.  Photo by Chris Tubbs.   This originally appeared in At Home with Textile Designer Orla Kiely.

    In the ground-floor eating area, the design team wrapped the walls in rich walnut to instill warmth often found in mid-century homes. “Sometimes one bold move is enough. Be brave with fewer statements,” Kiely advises. “Go for the big thing rather than lots of little things.” Kiely’s Upholstered Dining Chairs from her House collection surround a Danish vintage dining table. Her Gloss vases adorn the hallway console, which is also from her House line. Photo by Chris Tubbs.

    Photo by Chris Tubbs.
    This originally appeared in At Home with Textile Designer Orla Kiely.
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  Thanks to Matthew Hufft, their envelope-pushing architect and longtime friend, Hannah and Paul Catlett have a new home in southwestern Missouri that’s a fresh, unconventional take on the traditional farmhouse. He built the walnut bed and nightstands in the master bedroom with the help of Hannah’s two brothers. One of his clients at his hair salon gave him the American flag; the bedside lights are Tolomeo classic wall lamps by Artemide. The bed linens are from Inhabit. A sliding barn door rolls sideways to reveal the bathroom. Photo by Joe Pugliese.  Photo by Joe Pugliese.   This originally appeared in Modern Take on a Traditional Farmhouse in Missouri.

    Thanks to Matthew Hufft, their envelope-pushing architect and longtime friend, Hannah and Paul Catlett have a new home in southwestern Missouri that’s a fresh, unconventional take on the traditional farmhouse. He built the walnut bed and nightstands in the master bedroom with the help of Hannah’s two brothers. One of his clients at his hair salon gave him the American flag; the bedside lights are Tolomeo classic wall lamps by Artemide. The bed linens are from Inhabit. A sliding barn door rolls sideways to reveal the bathroom. Photo by Joe Pugliese.

    Photo by Joe Pugliese.
    This originally appeared in Modern Take on a Traditional Farmhouse in Missouri.
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  A couple takes a minimalist approach to their Brooklyn apartment, focusing on supple materials, subtle gradations of color, and custom finishes by local craftsmen. The Mandayam–Vohra family gathers under one of Workstead’s signature three-arm chandeliers, shown here in its horizontal configuration. Bartenschlager designed the white cabinets and is responsible for the walnut counters both on the kitchen island and near the stove. Photo by Matthew Williams.    This originally appeared in Kitchens We Love: Part 2.

    A couple takes a minimalist approach to their Brooklyn apartment, focusing on supple materials, subtle gradations of color, and custom finishes by local craftsmen. The Mandayam–Vohra family gathers under one of Workstead’s signature three-arm chandeliers, shown here in its horizontal configuration. Bartenschlager designed the white cabinets and is responsible for the walnut counters both on the kitchen island and near the stove. Photo by Matthew Williams.

    This originally appeared in Kitchens We Love: Part 2.
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  Bill Thompson’s Hollywood home exudes modern cool with a custom walnut dining table and chairs from Modernica. Photo by Zen Sekizawa.  Photo by Zen Sekizawa.   This originally appeared in Los Angeles Home with Wood-Clad Interior.

    Bill Thompson’s Hollywood home exudes modern cool with a custom walnut dining table and chairs from Modernica. Photo by Zen Sekizawa.

    Photo by Zen Sekizawa.
    This originally appeared in Los Angeles Home with Wood-Clad Interior.
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  Architect Drew Mandel updated a house in Toronto to look modern and cozy. The clients desired a warm material base for the interior so Mandel used American walnut for the flooring, millwork, and staircase. Loire limestone covers the landing below the steps and Calacatta marble clads the kitchen counters and island. Photo by Shai Gil.  Photo by Shai Gil.   This originally appeared in Reinventing a Traditional Edwardian near Lake Ontario .

    Architect Drew Mandel updated a house in Toronto to look modern and cozy. The clients desired a warm material base for the interior so Mandel used American walnut for the flooring, millwork, and staircase. Loire limestone covers the landing below the steps and Calacatta marble clads the kitchen counters and island. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.
    This originally appeared in Reinventing a Traditional Edwardian near Lake Ontario .
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  Surrounded on all sides by a sweeping Canadian hayfield, the 23.2 House is an angular ode to rural life. Out of “respect for the beams and their history,” Designer Omer Arbel insisted that not a single reclaimed plank—still marked by nailheads and chipped paint—be cut nor altered during ­construction, which gave the home its striking geometric motif. It’s what he refers to as the “alchemy between ­material and process,” which also inspired the textured ­concrete walls and crisply milled walnut furniture. Photo by Jason Schmidt.  Photo by Jason Schmidt.   This originally appeared in Modern Angular Rural Family Home in Canada.

    Surrounded on all sides by a sweeping Canadian hayfield, the 23.2 House is an angular ode to rural life. Out of “respect for the beams and their history,” Designer Omer Arbel insisted that not a single reclaimed plank—still marked by nailheads and chipped paint—be cut nor altered during ­construction, which gave the home its striking geometric motif. It’s what he refers to as the “alchemy between ­material and process,” which also inspired the textured ­concrete walls and crisply milled walnut furniture. Photo by Jason Schmidt.

    Photo by Jason Schmidt.
    This originally appeared in Modern Angular Rural Family Home in Canada.
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  Portland-based studio Jessica Helgerson Interior Design rehauled a Brooklyn brownstone with furnishings and finishes in bold colors and tactile materials. Dwell checks in with lead designer Chelsie Lee to get the scoop on the furniture and fittings. A quartet of red paints (Raspberry Truffle, Million Dollar Red, Vermillion, Arroyo Red), all by Benjamin Moore, make the built-in shelving in the dining area pop. The table is a custom design made of bookmatched walnut slabs joined by lacquered butterflies. The chairs are vintage Paul McCobb lacquered in turquoise (Benjamin Moore's Aruba Blue). The Ligne Roset Ruché sofa, designed by Inga Sempé, separates the living and dining spaces. The chandelier is by David Weeks Studio. Photo by Andrew Cammarano.  Photo by Andrew Cammarano.   This originally appeared in A Color-Drenched Brooklyn Brownstone.

    Portland-based studio Jessica Helgerson Interior Design rehauled a Brooklyn brownstone with furnishings and finishes in bold colors and tactile materials. Dwell checks in with lead designer Chelsie Lee to get the scoop on the furniture and fittings. A quartet of red paints (Raspberry Truffle, Million Dollar Red, Vermillion, Arroyo Red), all by Benjamin Moore, make the built-in shelving in the dining area pop. The table is a custom design made of bookmatched walnut slabs joined by lacquered butterflies. The chairs are vintage Paul McCobb lacquered in turquoise (Benjamin Moore's Aruba Blue). The Ligne Roset Ruché sofa, designed by Inga Sempé, separates the living and dining spaces. The chandelier is by David Weeks Studio. Photo by Andrew Cammarano.

    Photo by Andrew Cammarano.
    This originally appeared in A Color-Drenched Brooklyn Brownstone.
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Textile designer Orla Kiely's home

In the ground-floor eating area, the design team wrapped the walls in rich walnut to instill warmth often found in mid-century homes. “Sometimes one bold move is enough. Be brave with fewer statements,” Kiely advises. “Go for the big thing rather than lots of little things.” Kiely’s Upholstered Dining Chairs from her House collection surround a Danish vintage dining table. Her Gloss vases adorn the hallway console, which is also from her House line. Photo by Chris Tubbs.

Photo by Chris Tubbs.

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