written by:
October 18, 2013
Nothing screams "late fall" like a trip to a cabin. These seven homes fit the coziness bill, but with a modern slant that brings the housing typology into the 21st century.
Photo by Leo Mieles

The Georgian Bay Cottage treads lightly on the land, with a “long-shed” construction featuring a large sliding door and pull-down bug screen, a translucent corrugated-fiberglass roof, and exposed studs and ties. Photo by Leo Mieles.

Originally appeared in First-Class Cabins
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norwegian prefab cabin side exterior

A small prefab cabin in Norway is offering an alternative view on the concept of luxury. When Oslo-based architect Marianne Borge was approached in 2004 by a client who wanted an actual cabin rather than a second home, she was instantly inspired by the challenge of working on a smaller scale. Photos courtesy Marianne Borge.

Originally appeared in A Prefab Cabin in Norway
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Photo by Tom Bies

On a four-acre site on Salt Spring Island, just southwest of Vancouver, Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects crafted a cabin—modest in size yet bold in design—on the site where another cottage once stood. Photo by Tom Bies.

Originally appeared in First-Class Cabins
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Photo by Håkon Matre Aasarød

At the mouth of a fjord on the Fosen peninsula in Norway, form followed function to a small rocky outcrop called Vardehaugen. There, Fantastic Norway Architects constructed Cabin Vardehaugen atop the exposed, wind-whipped hill, taking its structural cues from the environment. Photo by Håkon Matre Aasarød.

Originally appeared in First-Class Cabins
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Modern cabin in Muscoda, Wisconsin

A steeply sloped site in the Wisconsin forest, plus an equally steep budget, led architect Brian Johnsen to reinvent the archetypal cabin for a sturdy vacation home. Photo by Narayan Mahon.

Originally appeared in Angular Architecture: 5 Modern Homes We Love
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Exterior view of hilltop cabin

A series of charred modern boxes, the home Petra Sattler-Smith and Klaus Mayer designed for Martin Buser and Kathy Chapoton, is organized around views of the Alaskan landscape. Photo by Kamil Bialous.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Modernist L-Shaped Charred Cedar Cabin in Alaska
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Cabin in Bear Valley.

Located off Highway 4 in the Stanislaus National Forest, Bear Valley opened in 1967, a relative latecomer to the California ski scene. Peek at a cluster of cabins built in the 1970s and 1980s here.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Snow in Bear Valley
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Photo by Leo Mieles

The Georgian Bay Cottage treads lightly on the land, with a “long-shed” construction featuring a large sliding door and pull-down bug screen, a translucent corrugated-fiberglass roof, and exposed studs and ties. Photo by Leo Mieles.

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