written by:
January 23, 2014
Eyes are the windows to the soul. And windows? Well, they broadcast a home's soul and create a connection between private, interior and public, exterior life. Here are a few ways to make maximum impact with windows.
Floating Farmhouse in Eldred New York

Self-taught designer Tom Givone resuscitated his 19th-century homestead by inserting a wall of skyscraper glass beneath a gabled extension on his wood-framed farmhouse. The spare but cozy kitchen now has a larger-than-life window onto the surrounding scenery. Photo by Mark Mahaney.

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Originally appeared in Hope Floats
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Pool gallery Seoul

In the case of Steven Holl's copper-clad pavilion in Seoul, the windows are the facade. Situated level with a placid pool, the reflective quality of the windows is heightened even further. Photo by Iwan Baan.

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Originally appeared in Music Holl: A Copper Clad Pavilion in Seoul
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Cedar clad home in Seattle.

The cedar-clad facade of the Tansu House in Seattle is pierced with thoughtfully placed windows, which frame views and “actively engage the idiosyncratic nature of the place,” says architect Tom Kundig.

Originally appeared in Modern Steel House in Seattle
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Irish-born actress Cornelia Hayes-O’Herlihy gazes across the Venetian roofscape. Her cozy glass enclosure rests atop the new home designed by her husband.

A dazzling display of windows wraps the heavily customized Venice, California, home of architect Lorcan O’Herlihy. His wife, Irish actress Cornelia Hayes-O’Herlihy, gazes across the roofscape in a cozy glass enclosure that rests atop the new home. Photo by Misha Gravenor.

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Originally appeared in Kaleidoscopic Cabinet
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Narrow brick house in Harlem, New York.

Yvette Leeper-Bueno and Adrian Bueno’s home, on West 112th Street in Harlem, is recognizable by its two-story bay window angled to bring light and views into the dark, narrow structure. The architects designed a two-story, galvanized-steel-clad bay window that angles toward nearby Morningside Park. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

Originally appeared in 5 Small and Narrow Modern Houses
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Modern bayfront house in Chile

The northern facade of this affordable beach house in Chile, takes in the water views via double-height windows in the main living room, plus terraces punched into the second floor. Photo by Roland Halbe.

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Originally appeared in A Simple Geometric Bayfront Home in Chile
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Great room of Glee star Jayma Mays in Los Feliz, Los Angeles

Architect Mike Jacobs renovated a 1925 house in Los Angeles for Glee star Jayma Mays, and reorganized the dim, disjointed layout to take advantage of her bright aesthetic and collection of modern furniture. Capitalizing on LA's nearly perfect weather, the architect removed walls to hollow out an expansive living-dining-kitchen area and punched out an exterior wall to accommodate a seamless plate glass window. Photo by Floto + Warner.

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Originally appeared in The Modern Renovated Home of Glee Star Jayma Mays
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Floating Farmhouse in Eldred New York

Self-taught designer Tom Givone resuscitated his 19th-century homestead by inserting a wall of skyscraper glass beneath a gabled extension on his wood-framed farmhouse. The spare but cozy kitchen now has a larger-than-life window onto the surrounding scenery. Photo by Mark Mahaney.

Photo by Mark Mahaney.

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