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July 14, 2013
Peek inside Argentinean architect and furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti's indoor-outdoor bedroom in his cozy and modern Buenos Aires home.
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  "People always say that Buenos Aires is like a European city [because of the baroque architecture and Italian heritage], but at the same time, we have our own culture, our own materials. This house is all B.A. In a way, I was trying to find something that represents us—and what we've got here is leather and wood and concrete."    This originally appeared in Net Assets.

    "People always say that Buenos Aires is like a European city [because of the baroque architecture and Italian heritage], but at the same time, we have our own culture, our own materials. This house is all B.A. In a way, I was trying to find something that represents us—and what we've got here is leather and wood and concrete."

    This originally appeared in Net Assets.
  • 
  Giant sliding doors open onto a wraparound deck peppered with potted plants from the couple’s vacations in Brazil, Uruguay, the Netherlands, and Italy.    This originally appeared in Net Assets.

    Giant sliding doors open onto a wraparound deck peppered with potted plants from the couple’s vacations in Brazil, Uruguay, the Netherlands, and Italy.

    This originally appeared in Net Assets.
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The master bedroom.

"People always say that Buenos Aires is like a European city [because of the baroque architecture and Italian heritage], but at the same time, we have our own culture, our own materials. This house is all B.A. In a way, I was trying to find something that represents us—and what we've got here is leather and wood and concrete."

In Argentinean architect and furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti's bedroom, dappled sunlight and reclaimed-wood floors and walls give the room a warm, peaceful feel.


"I try to use simple, honest materials. I don’t like paint or plaster; I prefer to leave things as they come, and show how things are made," says Sticotti. As throughout his house, furniture from the designer's own line provides most of the bedroom's decorative flourishes. Among the pieces in the room are Sticotti's wooden stools topped with woven rawhide and tray-topped side tables used as nightstands.

Modern house in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Giant sliding doors open onto a wraparound deck peppered with potted plants from the couple’s vacations in Brazil, Uruguay, the Netherlands, and Italy.

Floor-to-ceiling glass doors slide open onto a large deck, physically extending the interior living space. The deck overflows with terra-cotta pots whose contents tell the story of Sticotti and his wife's past and present lives: plants and cacti from their previous apartments and gardens; other people's discarded plants, snagged off downtown sidewalks; and blooming souvenirs from their travels.

See the rest of the furniture designer's unique house.

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