written by:
September 3, 2013
Summer days are long in Scandinavia, and we can't think of any better place to spend the sunny hours than in—and around—these chic and stylish summer houses. As the summer winds down stateside, we present our favorite summer homes from Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Finland.
  • 
  Helsinki architect Ville Hara and designer Linda Bergroth collaborated on a prefab shed-meets-sleeping-cabin, which can be assembled with little else than a screwdriver. Bergroth, inspired by nomadic yurt-dwellers, wanted an indoor/outdoor experience for her property in Finland, a small island owned by her parents, where she spent childhood summers. Photo by Arsi Ikäheimonen.   Photo by Arsi Ikäheimonen.

    Helsinki architect Ville Hara and designer Linda Bergroth collaborated on a prefab shed-meets-sleeping-cabin, which can be assembled with little else than a screwdriver. Bergroth, inspired by nomadic yurt-dwellers, wanted an indoor/outdoor experience for her property in Finland, a small island owned by her parents, where she spent childhood summers. Photo by Arsi Ikäheimonen.

     

    Photo by Arsi Ikäheimonen.
  • 
  On an 18th-century farmstead in rural Sweden, two Copenhagen designers handcrafted a summerhouse that seamlessly melds the modern and the traditional. In the kitchen area and throughout the home, Mads Odgård, shown here, and Mette Lyng Hansen mixed Odgård’s pieces, such as the Odgård kettle for Raadvad and custom table, with Ikea basics and the Workshop pendant lamp by Louis Poulsen. Photo by Åke E:son Lindman.

    On an 18th-century farmstead in rural Sweden, two Copenhagen designers handcrafted a summerhouse that seamlessly melds the modern and the traditional. In the kitchen area and throughout the home, Mads Odgård, shown here, and Mette Lyng Hansen mixed Odgård’s pieces, such as the Odgård kettle for Raadvad and custom table, with Ikea basics and the Workshop pendant lamp by Louis Poulsen. Photo by Åke E:son Lindman.

  • 
  This summer house, renovated by Jonas Labbé and Johannes Schotanus of LASC for a family in Skåne, Sweden, demonstrates how strong design, thoughtfully placed bursts of strong color, and honest natural treatment can elevate even the simplest forms and materials. The architects opened up the original house by removing two-thirds of the walls and ceilings. This created one large living and kitchen space that extends to a lounge on the first floor. The protruding storage box (upper left) marks the transition to the library corridor and vertically frames the living room. Photo by Thomas Ibsen.

    This summer house, renovated by Jonas Labbé and Johannes Schotanus of LASC for a family in Skåne, Sweden, demonstrates how strong design, thoughtfully placed bursts of strong color, and honest natural treatment can elevate even the simplest forms and materials. The architects opened up the original house by removing two-thirds of the walls and ceilings. This created one large living and kitchen space that extends to a lounge on the first floor. The protruding storage box (upper left) marks the transition to the library corridor and vertically frames the living room. Photo by Thomas Ibsen.

  • 
  At a couple's rustic summer house in a Norwegian island, the sauna door handle is a simple piece of driftwood. "One principle rule I followed," says the resident Jürgen Kiehl, an architect, "was: Don’t build on outdoor space if it can work as outdoor living space. Norwegian summers are short. We want to be outdoors as much as possible." Photo by Pia Ulin.  Photo by Pia Ulin.

    At a couple's rustic summer house in a Norwegian island, the sauna door handle is a simple piece of driftwood. "One principle rule I followed," says the resident Jürgen Kiehl, an architect, "was: Don’t build on outdoor space if it can work as outdoor living space. Norwegian summers are short. We want to be outdoors as much as possible." Photo by Pia Ulin.

    Photo by Pia Ulin.
  • 
  For his family’s summerhouse in North Zealand, Denmark, resourceful architect Jesper Brask went full tilt with native wood and playful geometries. Here, his kids Niels and Jens hang out in the dining area. Like the wall behind it, the table was crafted from the felled trees. The floor is soap-treated pine found offsite. Brask bought the chairs at a flea market; the galvanized-steel pendant lamps are from AART Architects in Denmark. The doors at right open to the deck, which leads to a studio that the boys frequent on their stays. Photo by Karina Tengberg.  Photo by Karina Tengberg.

    For his family’s summerhouse in North Zealand, Denmark, resourceful architect Jesper Brask went full tilt with native wood and playful geometries. Here, his kids Niels and Jens hang out in the dining area. Like the wall behind it, the table was crafted from the felled trees. The floor is soap-treated pine found offsite. Brask bought the chairs at a flea market; the galvanized-steel pendant lamps are from AART Architects in Denmark. The doors at right open to the deck, which leads to a studio that the boys frequent on their stays. Photo by Karina Tengberg.

    Photo by Karina Tengberg.
Previous Next
Slideshow loading...
@current / @total
Modern prefab shed in Finland

Helsinki architect Ville Hara and designer Linda Bergroth collaborated on a prefab shed-meets-sleeping-cabin, which can be assembled with little else than a screwdriver. Bergroth, inspired by nomadic yurt-dwellers, wanted an indoor/outdoor experience for her property in Finland, a small island owned by her parents, where she spent childhood summers. Photo by Arsi Ikäheimonen.

 

Photo by Arsi Ikäheimonen.

You May Also Like

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...