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December 21, 2013
A free-standing pavilion can accent a building, provide temporary shelter and function as a pleasurable home away from home. Here are four very different examples of the modern pavilion, accompanied by the architects' original blueprints for the designs.
The 1,000-square-foot pavilion was completed in 2009 as a volunteer structure and tool shed--though today its used far more by the public than initially anticipated. "The garden was wiped out after the storm," McKay recalls. "There was nothing, zero. Volu

Architect Mike McKay moved to Louisiana for two years during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Since many of the cypress trees and gardens in City Park were destroyed in the storm, volunteers took responsibility for maintaining the park. McKay stepped up to design a 1,000-square-foot pavilion for the volunteers. With money from donors and material contributions from places like Gallina, Extech and Acadia Hardwoods, the New Orleans Botanical Garden Duplantier Volunteer Pavilion was built. Photo by Frank Doering.

Originally appeared in Botanical Garden Pavilion
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McKay devised a modular system of arches that would define the open-air structure. Using the donated cypress and aluminum, he created six wall-and-roof modules and slid them closer together or further apart to accomodate the existing trees and roots. "Bec

In order to avoid destroying any of the tree's roots, McKay created six separate modules. "Because there are so many trees on the site, we had to negotiate a system in the initial design phase," McKay says. "When we were constructing the pavilion, if we hit a root, and we did, we could just move the modular without it affecting the overall design or construction." Photo by Frank Doering.

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Modern interpretation of a Charleston single clad in ipe wood louvers that encourage a cross breeze.

Built as a modern interpretation of Charleston architecture, Stephen Yablon Architect designed this pavilion using durable ipe wood. The 1,500 square foot space features built-in furniture and an outdoor kitchen. Photo by Michael Moran.

Courtesy of 
Michael Moran
Originally appeared in Summer-Ready Modern Pavilion in South Carolina
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A section of a Sullivan's Island beach house shows the covered veranda space underneath the 1,500 square foot addition.

For the rear facade of the pavilion, SYA used standing-seam metal, a popular Charleston roofing material. Photo by Michael Moran.

Courtesy of 
Courtesy Stephen Yablon Architect
Originally appeared in Summer-Ready Modern Pavilion in South Carolina
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Todd, a software developer, met Carpenter when the two collaborated on website projects. As the Dominey family grew, Todd and his wife, Heather, both fans of the Case Study Houses and the work of Alvar Aalto, Richard Neutra, and Donald Judd, asked Carpent

Architect William Carpenter of Lightroom Studio designed this pavilion as an addition to a home for a growing family. At the homeowner's request, Carpenter carefully built the pavilion around a white oak with the health of the tree in mind.

Originally appeared in Dominey Pavilion and Carport
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In addition to the covered pavilion, the structure Carpenter designed includes an exterior deck, garden, and driveway. The biggest obstacle was siting the components around the initially sick white oak tree.

The Dominey family pavilion features a carport, spaces for entertaining and an outdoor fireplace.

Originally appeared in Dominey Pavilion and Carport
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Architect Steven Holl was inspired by composer István Anhalt's complex and never-performed 1967 Symphony of Modules when creating this pavilion in Seoul. Photo by Iwan Baan.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Music Holl: A Copper Clad Pavilion in Seoul
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Watercolor by architect Steven Holl.

The pavilion consists of copper panels, rectangular skylights and an infinity-type pool. Holl's goal was to create a space that gives off the impression that there is no exterior. Photo by Iwan Baan.

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Music Holl: A Copper Clad Pavilion in Seoul
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The 1,000-square-foot pavilion was completed in 2009 as a volunteer structure and tool shed--though today its used far more by the public than initially anticipated. "The garden was wiped out after the storm," McKay recalls. "There was nothing, zero. Volu

Architect Mike McKay moved to Louisiana for two years during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Since many of the cypress trees and gardens in City Park were destroyed in the storm, volunteers took responsibility for maintaining the park. McKay stepped up to design a 1,000-square-foot pavilion for the volunteers. With money from donors and material contributions from places like Gallina, Extech and Acadia Hardwoods, the New Orleans Botanical Garden Duplantier Volunteer Pavilion was built. Photo by Frank Doering.

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