written by:
August 14, 2013
Since the very beginning of Dwell's inception, in 2000, we've had a department called My House. This is a recurring story type that's often told from the resident's perspective, in the first person, presented in such a way that any reader can integrate ideas, materials, and techniques into their own homes. My House is always a narrative of a design lover who learned valuable lessons along the way of building their dream home. Here we present five of our favorites from the archives.
From the side door of his restored two-bedroom bungalow, Dollahite watches his 
dog West inspect the newly installed low-maintenance landscaping and brick patio.

A Recent Grad's First Home in Austin

The first year out of college is a wildcard for most people. Whether spent bumming around Europe with a backpack or slogging through a suffocating desk job, it’s often a year with little bearing on life’s next chapter. But Blake Dollahite—and his father—saw an opportunity in this transitional time to build a foundation for his future. With a small bank loan and a lot of helping hands, Dollahite dove into his first year of freedom by shackling himself to a rundown Austin bungalow and preparing to make it home.

Photo by: Misty Keasler

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Salvage Love
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The DeBartolos wanted to keep the desert tradition of incorporating water near the entrance of the house as a sort of welcome mat, but they skipped the faux hacienda fountain found throughout Arizona in favor of twin sheets of four-by-eight-foot steel pla

A Shared Home for Jesuit Priests in Phoenix

For men of the cloth, architecture has always been one earthly delight they've been encouraged to indulge. In Arizona, DeBartolo Architects continues the tradition in a rather unorthodox manner.

Photo by: Bill Timmerman

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Houses of the Holy
2 / 5
White New York apartment with sleeping nook and parquet flooring

A New York Architect's 560-square-foot Apartment

"I'm used to spending time on boats," says New York based architect and interior designer Page Goolrick, who has been sailing competitively for 15 years. "It's influenced my design. Sailing vessels are beautifully designed, flexible, made for performance, but also attractive.

Photo by: Dean Kaufman

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Urban Vessel
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The residents worked with architecture firm Resolution: 4 Architecture on the specs for their prefab cabin, and then commissioned Simplex to assemble it on their factory floor and drive it out to their remote Virginia location.

A Young Family's Prefab Cabin in West Virginia

A “tree house” of clean lines, ample glass, and thoughtful ingenuity lets a Washington, DC–area family and a stream of weekend guests enjoy prefab living in an unlikely locale: just outside Lost River, West Virginia.

Photo by: Chris Mueller

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Take Me Home
4 / 5
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From the side door of his restored two-bedroom bungalow, Dollahite watches his 
dog West inspect the newly installed low-maintenance landscaping and brick patio.

A Recent Grad's First Home in Austin

The first year out of college is a wildcard for most people. Whether spent bumming around Europe with a backpack or slogging through a suffocating desk job, it’s often a year with little bearing on life’s next chapter. But Blake Dollahite—and his father—saw an opportunity in this transitional time to build a foundation for his future. With a small bank loan and a lot of helping hands, Dollahite dove into his first year of freedom by shackling himself to a rundown Austin bungalow and preparing to make it home.

Photo by: Misty Keasler

Photo by Misty Keasler.

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