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January 17, 2014
Any time of year, including winter, is ideal for enjoying a home close to the shore. To follow, we offer 7 from our archives with very different points of view.
Beach house living room view of outside

With authenticity and simplicity as their rallying cry, a Kiwi architect and his wife have built a modern beach house that puts a fresh spin on the local vernacular. The bach’s beachfront site is nestled behind sand dunes with views toward Kapiti Island, a nature sanctuary. Photo by Matthew Williams.

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matthew williams
Originally appeared in Bach to the Beach
1 / 7

Having admired a project by Shane Blue of Bourne + Blue Architecture in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, James and Sue O’Sullivan asked the architect to help them create a beachside family compound in Diamond Beach, about a two-hour drive from their main house. Photo by Simon Whitbread. 

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Copyright Simon Whitbread
Originally appeared in Adventures in Oz
2 / 7
trailer, malibu, beach, small

Once a classic trailer-park scheme of mint green and white, the exterior of Commune Images owner Sofie Howard’s 500-square-foot Malibu trailer was distinctively repainted. The gate is a patchwork of scrap wood pieces. Partly inspired by 1970s Vans slip-ons, Howard’s boyfriend, artist Grant Shumate, painted accent lines on the side of the trailer. The porch houses a seating area with handmade MORERA Boxes from Commune, and a new outdoor shower. The entrance is beneath the wood-framed canopy. Photo by Spencer Lowell. 

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Originally appeared in A Modern Beachside Trailer Home in Malibu
3 / 7
Dining table window view of the beach

For centuries, Spain’s Canary Islands have been the last outpost of civilization before European mariners sailed headlong into the vast Atlantic. That same sense of horizon-bound, seaside fortitude marks the singular homes that a few hardy residents of the Canary Island of Tenerife have literally built into the coastal rock. Whether humble cottages teetering on craggy promontories or actual volcanic caves out of which sunbaked homes have grown, this brand of beach living is about as far from Costa del Sol condos as the Canaries are from the Spanish mainland. Photographer Gunnar Knechtel takes us inside some of the most unusual homes we’ve ever seen and shows us an inspiring intersection of design and living that blossoms up from the cracks. Cave dwelling so near the seemingly endless blue water has a distinctly no-frills vibe, but it’s hard to argue with the view. Photo by Gunnar Knechtel. 

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Originally appeared in On The Rocks
4 / 7
Benjamin Moore custom-matched paint color for the front door

When the Fisher family’s 1960s Long Island beach bungalow started to crumble, they sought an architect who’d preserve the home’s humble roots and mellow vibe, while subtly bringing the place up to date. The color of the Fishers’ front door was inspired by an old Land Rover Defender’s hue, which Charlie had Benjamin Moore custom-match. Photo by Richard Foulser. 

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Originally appeared in Long Island Found
5 / 7
Modern beach house in Southern California

Matt Jacobson doesn’t just abide by the mantra “less is more,” he wholeheartedly embraces it. His Southern California home is a compact ode to minimal living. Joined by architect Michael Lee and friend Gus McConnell, Jacobson shouts up to Dukes that they’re headed out for an impromptu surf session. Photo by Dave Lauridsen. 

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Originally appeared in Basic Instincts
6 / 7

From the deck of this waterfront house, the scenery is abuzz with Northern California wildlife–but there's not a utility bill in sight. At the rear of the house, bleacher-style steps mitigate the steep grade down to the water; the boathouse tucks in on the right. Photo by Matthew Millman.

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Originally appeared in The Green Lagoon
7 / 7
Beach house living room view of outside

With authenticity and simplicity as their rallying cry, a Kiwi architect and his wife have built a modern beach house that puts a fresh spin on the local vernacular. The bach’s beachfront site is nestled behind sand dunes with views toward Kapiti Island, a nature sanctuary. Photo by Matthew Williams.

Photo by Matthew Williams. Image courtesy of matthew williams.

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