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September 24, 2013
Time and again, so many modern architects tell us that they are heavily influenced by Japanese design. We go straight to the source with 5 of our favorite homes in Japan from the pages of Dwell.
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  This flower shop, art gallery, and home (of Yurika Ninomiya and her husband, Takuya) in central Nagoya fits into 1,115 square feet, thanks to architect Makoto Tanijiri. Photo by Takashi Homma.   Photo by Takashi Homma.   This originally appeared in Small Space Live/Work Box Home in Japan.

    This flower shop, art gallery, and home (of Yurika Ninomiya and her husband, Takuya) in central Nagoya fits into 1,115 square feet, thanks to architect Makoto Tanijiri. Photo by Takashi Homma

    Photo by Takashi Homma.
    This originally appeared in Small Space Live/Work Box Home in Japan.
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  A Tokyo-based couple asked architects Takaharu and Yui Tezuka to design a small home that would evoke a little bit of Italy. The entire interior wall opens, extending the house visually and socially into the small garden that lies between the multigenerational family’s two homes. Photo by Adam Friedberg.  Photo by Adam Friedberg.   This originally appeared in Family Style.

    A Tokyo-based couple asked architects Takaharu and Yui Tezuka to design a small home that would evoke a little bit of Italy. The entire interior wall opens, extending the house visually and socially into the small garden that lies between the multigenerational family’s two homes. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

    Photo by Adam Friedberg.
    This originally appeared in Family Style.
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  Terunobu Fujimori's Charred Cedar House, completed in 2007. As the name implies, the entire home is clad in charred cedar boards, which have been treated with an ancient Japanese technique that seals the wood against rain and rot. Photo by Adam Friedberg.     This originally appeared in Facade Focus: Charred Cedar.

    Terunobu Fujimori's Charred Cedar House, completed in 2007. As the name implies, the entire home is clad in charred cedar boards, which have been treated with an ancient Japanese technique that seals the wood against rain and rot. Photo by Adam Friedberg

    This originally appeared in Facade Focus: Charred Cedar.
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  From architect Makoto Tanijiri, a house in Fukawa, located in the suburbs of Hiroshima, appears to be a simple, unassuming box on the outside, yet offers a surprisingly roomy experience within. Photo by Toshiyuki Yano.   Photo by Toshiyuki Yano.   This originally appeared in House in Fukawa.

    From architect Makoto Tanijiri, a house in Fukawa, located in the suburbs of Hiroshima, appears to be a simple, unassuming box on the outside, yet offers a surprisingly roomy experience within. Photo by Toshiyuki Yano. 

    Photo by Toshiyuki Yano.
    This originally appeared in House in Fukawa.
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  For Hideyuki Nakayama’s 2004, a private residence amid a new residential development in Matsumoto, Japan, the distance between site and structure is more dramatic in the evening when light shines through the sunken glass living room.     This originally appeared in Hideyuki Nakayama's '2004' House.

    For Hideyuki Nakayama’s 2004, a private residence amid a new residential development in Matsumoto, Japan, the distance between site and structure is more dramatic in the evening when light shines through the sunken glass living room. 

    This originally appeared in Hideyuki Nakayama's '2004' House.
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Modern box house in Nagoya, Japan

This flower shop, art gallery, and home (of Yurika Ninomiya and her husband, Takuya) in central Nagoya fits into 1,115 square feet, thanks to architect Makoto Tanijiri. Photo by Takashi Homma

Photo by Takashi Homma.

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