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Up in the Woods: 8 Forest Homes

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Eight riffs on the cozy cabin typology that make the most of a forest setting with modern architecture that connects to the outdoors.
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  Architect MJ Neal, much like his hometown of Austin, Texas, possesses a balanced combination of country cordiality and urban edge. Along the entire west side of the house, a lush courtyard creates private exterior space that can be enjoyed during much of the year in Austin, particularly with large shade trees overhead. The entire ground level of the house opens onto the courtyard, including the first-floor shower.

    Architect MJ Neal, much like his hometown of Austin, Texas, possesses a balanced combination of country cordiality and urban edge. Along the entire west side of the house, a lush courtyard creates private exterior space that can be enjoyed during much of the year in Austin, particularly with large shade trees overhead. The entire ground level of the house opens onto the courtyard, including the first-floor shower.

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  For this tiny house in the Belgian forest, a little extra square footage comes in the form of a glassed-in addition with a stellar view.Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse  Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

    For this tiny house in the Belgian forest, a little extra square footage comes in the form of a glassed-in addition with a stellar view.

    Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

    Photo by: Frederik Vercruysse

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  In the most unlikely of places—rural Missouri—Rocio Romero has designed and built a prefab empire. Conceived as studios, backyard offices, guest cottages, and short-term getaways, the 456-square-foot Base Camp and 312-square-foot Fish Camp will both be priced in the $20,000 range. Here, a Fish Camp acts as a couple’s forest getaway, just a quarter mile from their main house.Photo by: Dean Kaufman  Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    In the most unlikely of places—rural Missouri—Rocio Romero has designed and built a prefab empire. Conceived as studios, backyard offices, guest cottages, and short-term getaways, the 456-square-foot Base Camp and 312-square-foot Fish Camp will both be priced in the $20,000 range. Here, a Fish Camp acts as a couple’s forest getaway, just a quarter mile from their main house.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  A film writer and director asked Austin, Texas–based architect Henry Panton to build a bunkhouse with a huge screen porch for family and guests on his 40-acre property in Bastrop, Texas. Situated over a dry creek bed and carefully crafted around the existing loblolly pine trees, the bunkhouse “is sort of like a bridge into the woods,” says Panton of the 1,400-square-foot structure.Photo by: Greg Hursley

    A film writer and director asked Austin, Texas–based architect Henry Panton to build a bunkhouse with a huge screen porch for family and guests on his 40-acre property in Bastrop, Texas. Situated over a dry creek bed and carefully crafted around the existing loblolly pine trees, the bunkhouse “is sort of like a bridge into the woods,” says Panton of the 1,400-square-foot structure.

    Photo by: Greg Hursley

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  Built on a challenging hillside site and tucked behind a thicket of trees, the Bridgman, Michigan, house designed by Scott Rappe provides a modern weekend retreat for a Chicago couple.  Photo by: Steve Hall, Hedrich Blessing

    Built on a challenging hillside site and tucked behind a thicket of trees, the Bridgman, Michigan, house designed by Scott Rappe provides a modern weekend retreat for a Chicago couple.

    Photo by: Steve Hall, Hedrich Blessing

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  A gently winding set of exposed aggregate concrete pads leads to the Wabi House’s front door. Architect Sebastian Mariscal sought to “hide the house behind a dense forest front yard.” As the crape myrtles grow in, they will further filter the home’s facade. During construction, the construction team adjusted the design to accommodate the boughs of an old pine tree in the backyard.Photo by: Daniel Hennessy  Photo by: Daniel HennessyCourtesy of: ©2010 DANIEL HENNESSY PHOTOGRAPHY

    A gently winding set of exposed aggregate concrete pads leads to the Wabi House’s front door. Architect Sebastian Mariscal sought to “hide the house behind a dense forest front yard.” As the crape myrtles grow in, they will further filter the home’s facade. During construction, the construction team adjusted the design to accommodate the boughs of an old pine tree in the backyard.

    Photo by: Daniel Hennessy

    Photo by: Daniel Hennessy

    Courtesy of: ©2010 DANIEL HENNESSY PHOTOGRAPHY

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  This weekend retreat in the dense forest of Agatsuma-gun for an elderly couple, designed by Go Hasegawa, is lofted 21 feet in the air.Photo by: Go Hasegawa  Photo by: Go Hasegawa

    This weekend retreat in the dense forest of Agatsuma-gun for an elderly couple, designed by Go Hasegawa, is lofted 21 feet in the air.

    Photo by: Go Hasegawa

    Photo by: Go Hasegawa

  • 
  When architect Brett Nave and his partner, architect Kelley Bishiop, began developing the Heron Park neighborhood in the coastal town of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they managed to lay 1,200 feet of road through a forest and pecan orchard while only removing six trees

    When architect Brett Nave and his partner, architect Kelley Bishiop, began developing the Heron Park neighborhood in the coastal town of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they managed to lay 1,200 feet of road through a forest and pecan orchard while only removing six trees

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