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Walter Gropius, Hagerty House

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Walter Gropius wanted the Hagerty House, his first commission in the United States, to be as close to the sea as possible. He sited the structure a precarious 20 feet from the shore and let the setting dictate the design.

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  Early on, the house's simplicity had great appeal to Jan Sasseen, the current owner. From walls to rugs to furniture, "pretty much everything is white," she says. "When I was decorating, I picked the most basic things I could find. Nothing had details or frills."  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Early on, the house's simplicity had great appeal to Jan Sasseen, the current owner. From walls to rugs to furniture, "pretty much everything is white," she says. "When I was decorating, I picked the most basic things I could find. Nothing had details or frills."

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  In the living room, there's a black leather Le Corbusier lounge and a Minotti sofa set.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    In the living room, there's a black leather Le Corbusier lounge and a Minotti sofa set.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The kitchen is perfect both for eating and for doing projects.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The kitchen is perfect both for eating and for doing projects.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  The main staircase consists of simple oak treads that cantilever out from side walls sheathed in natural vertical board and are supported on the other side by a continuous grill-like railing truss.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    The main staircase consists of simple oak treads that cantilever out from side walls sheathed in natural vertical board and are supported on the other side by a continuous grill-like railing truss.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  In the dining room, Mies van der Rohe chairs surround a custom-made cherry table. Black-and-white photographs of Sasseen's children and grandchildren are arranged systematically on the back wall.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    In the dining room, Mies van der Rohe chairs surround a custom-made cherry table. Black-and-white photographs of Sasseen's children and grandchildren are arranged systematically on the back wall.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Upstairs, the bedrooms are arranged in a uniform line of five cubicles. Initially, each bedroom had a vividly colored western wall—red, blue, yellow, or green—with the remaining three walls painted white.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Upstairs, the bedrooms are arranged in a uniform line of five cubicles. Initially, each bedroom had a vividly colored western wall—red, blue, yellow, or green—with the remaining three walls painted white.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  WALTER GROPIUS, HAGERTY HOUSEWalter Gropius wanted the Hagerty House, his first commission in the United States, to be as close to the sea as possible. He sited the structure a precarious 20 feet from the shore and let the setting dictate the design.   Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    WALTER GROPIUS, HAGERTY HOUSE

    Walter Gropius wanted the Hagerty House, his first commission in the United States, to be as close to the sea as possible. He sited the structure a precarious 20 feet from the shore and let the setting dictate the design.

     

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  Until Sasseen took ownership, the ground at the back of the house was sheathed in concrete. She created a softer environment when she replaced it with bluestone and planted beach grass that rustles in the ocean breeze.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman
    Until Sasseen took ownership, the ground at the back of the house was sheathed in concrete. She created a softer environment when she replaced it with bluestone and planted beach grass that rustles in the ocean breeze.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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