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Upwardly Mobile Homes

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When it comes to real estate, the trailer park gets a bad rap. But some designers think that this forsaken corner of the market is worthy of reevaluation—and even resuscitation.

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  Michael Hughes and his University of Colorado collaborators transformed a 10-by-47-foot trailer destined for the landfill into the striking TrailerWrap “rehab” prototype.
    Michael Hughes and his University of Colorado collaborators transformed a 10-by-47-foot trailer destined for the landfill into the striking TrailerWrap “rehab” prototype.
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  The interior of the TrailerWrap prototype.
    The interior of the TrailerWrap prototype.
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  Architect Christopher C. Deam’s Glassic Flat attempts to put the “pre” back into prefab: When the unit leaves the Breckenridge factory on the flatbed of a stylish big rig, it is ready for occupation.
    Architect Christopher C. Deam’s Glassic Flat attempts to put the “pre” back into prefab: When the unit leaves the Breckenridge factory on the flatbed of a stylish big rig, it is ready for occupation.
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  The 400-square-foot interior of the Glassic Flat boasts a bedroom, bathroom, storage, and open living area and kitchen.
    The 400-square-foot interior of the Glassic Flat boasts a bedroom, bathroom, storage, and open living area and kitchen.
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  Andy Thomson’s miniHome takes cues from the trailer park (it’s mobile) but pushes a new aesthetic and uses sustainable building practices and materials.
    Andy Thomson’s miniHome takes cues from the trailer park (it’s mobile) but pushes a new aesthetic and uses sustainable building practices and materials.
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  An interior shot of the miniHome, conceived by Andy Thomson.
    An interior shot of the miniHome, conceived by Andy Thomson.

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