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Toronto's 10 Top Homes

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Toronto: largest city in Canada, capital of Ontario, and seat of multiculturalism in our neighbor to the north. (It's also currently host to the most active construction cranes in North America!) Here's a primer on ten great Toronto homes from the Dwell archive.
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  Seeking more space and a connection with the city, an artist and a designer turn an old Toronto storefront in Dundas West into a home and studio. Photo by Naomi Finlay.  Photo by: Naomi Finlay

    Seeking more space and a connection with the city, an artist and a designer turn an old Toronto storefront in Dundas West into a home and studio. Photo by Naomi Finlay.

    Photo by: Naomi Finlay

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  When a family couldn’t part with a traditional Edwardian, their architect introduced a world of design inspiration instead. Architect Drew Mandel mounted an interior fireplace in a blackened-steel frame which echoes the window and door treatment on the house’s new facade. Photo by Shai Gil.  Photo by: Shai GilCourtesy of: Shai Gil

    When a family couldn’t part with a traditional Edwardian, their architect introduced a world of design inspiration instead. Architect Drew Mandel mounted an interior fireplace in a blackened-steel frame which echoes the window and door treatment on the house’s new facade. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by: Shai Gil

    Courtesy of: Shai Gil

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  For a Toronto couple with a love of minimalist Japanese architecture, a sleek, storage-packed kitchen was the first priority in their home's renovation. Photo by Bob Gundu.  Photo by: Bob Gundu

    For a Toronto couple with a love of minimalist Japanese architecture, a sleek, storage-packed kitchen was the first priority in their home's renovation. Photo by Bob Gundu.

    Photo by: Bob Gundu

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  When a client demanded a program that seemed impossible to fit in a 40’ by 110’ lot, especially if one tries to respect a tight zoning for an infill project in a city like Toronto, architect Reza Aliabadi decided to practice the challenges of “no leftover space” with a simple rule in mind: every inch is a usable inch. Photo by borXu Design.  Photo by: borXu Design

    When a client demanded a program that seemed impossible to fit in a 40’ by 110’ lot, especially if one tries to respect a tight zoning for an infill project in a city like Toronto, architect Reza Aliabadi decided to practice the challenges of “no leftover space” with a simple rule in mind: every inch is a usable inch. Photo by borXu Design.

    Photo by: borXu Design

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  With ingenuity and plenty of elbow grease, architect John Tong turned an old Toronto dairy into the ultimate family clubhouse. Photo by Christopher Wahl.  Photo by: Christopher Wahl

    With ingenuity and plenty of elbow grease, architect John Tong turned an old Toronto dairy into the ultimate family clubhouse. Photo by Christopher Wahl.

    Photo by: Christopher Wahl

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  This Canadian duo searches out top Scandinavian and Japanese designs and brings their best finds back to this Toronto shop. Photo by Christopher Wahl. (Check out Dwell's upcoming March 2014 issue for a look at the owners' home, which is situated above the shop!)  Photo by: Christopher Wahl

    This Canadian duo searches out top Scandinavian and Japanese designs and brings their best finds back to this Toronto shop. Photo by Christopher Wahl. (Check out Dwell's upcoming March 2014 issue for a look at the owners' home, which is situated above the shop!)

    Photo by: Christopher Wahl

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  A celestial light installation illuminates the garage door of a recently renovated Toronto house designed by architect Janna Levitt. Photo by Philip Cheung.

    A celestial light installation illuminates the garage door of a recently renovated Toronto house designed by architect Janna Levitt. Photo by Philip Cheung.

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  Designing an innovative house is a rite of passage for many young architects. But building in a city doesn’t always make experimentation easy; after all, neighbors have their own ideas about how a block is supposed to look. Photo by Juliana Sohn.  Photo by: Juliana Sohn

    Designing an innovative house is a rite of passage for many young architects. But building in a city doesn’t always make experimentation easy; after all, neighbors have their own ideas about how a block is supposed to look. Photo by Juliana Sohn.

    Photo by: Juliana Sohn

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  Thanks to Levitt Goodman Architects, a dim Toronto Tudor gets an airy new look with a top-level remodel and some bright ideas.   Courtesy of: Copyright: Finn O'Hara

    Thanks to Levitt Goodman Architects, a dim Toronto Tudor gets an airy new look with a top-level remodel and some bright ideas

    Courtesy of: Copyright: Finn O'Hara

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  Facing tight building codes and an even tighter space, Karen White and David MacNaughtan needed an architect who could turn lemons into lemonade. Donald Chong devised a refreshing solution. Photo by Dean Kaufman.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Facing tight building codes and an even tighter space, Karen White and David MacNaughtan needed an architect who could turn lemons into lemonade. Donald Chong devised a refreshing solution. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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