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Stealthy Modern Cabin in Ontario

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Toronto architecture firm superkül applies creative green thinking and a Canadian love of timber to an affordable modern cabin in the woods.
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  Sited on a lake near Bracebridge, Ontario, this small-footprint family cottage was designed by Toronto firm superkül to integrate with its natural surroundings and minimize its environmental impact. The clients, a married couple, had mixed feelings about going completely modern with their cabin's aesthetic, so the architects created a sculptural wood form to bridge the gap between traditional and contemporary. Photo by Shai Gil.
  Photo by Shai Gil.

    Sited on a lake near Bracebridge, Ontario, this small-footprint family cottage was designed by Toronto firm superkül to integrate with its natural surroundings and minimize its environmental impact. The clients, a married couple, had mixed feelings about going completely modern with their cabin's aesthetic, so the architects created a sculptural wood form to bridge the gap between traditional and contemporary. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.
  • 
  Using wood as the primary building material imbues an aesthetic warmth to the structure. It's also cost-effective, considering the abundance of Canada's natural timber resources and strong local carpentry trade. Photo by Shai Gil.
  Photo by Shai Gil.

    Using wood as the primary building material imbues an aesthetic warmth to the structure. It's also cost-effective, considering the abundance of Canada's natural timber resources and strong local carpentry trade. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.
  • 
  Material continuity speaks to both minimalist modernism and to simplifying costs: Cedar was used throughout, on the interior walls and ceilings, on the roof, and as exterior cladding. Photo by Shai Gil.
  Photo by Shai Gil.

    Material continuity speaks to both minimalist modernism and to simplifying costs: Cedar was used throughout, on the interior walls and ceilings, on the roof, and as exterior cladding. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.
  • 
  The cabin was designed so that the north half can be closed off when not in use to reduce energy consumption. When the northern half is closed, the radiant floor heating can be turned off and the main area can be heated by the high efficiency wood fireplace. Photo by Shai Gil.
  Photo by Shai Gil.

    The cabin was designed so that the north half can be closed off when not in use to reduce energy consumption. When the northern half is closed, the radiant floor heating can be turned off and the main area can be heated by the high efficiency wood fireplace. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.
  • 
  The 1,500-square-foot cabin merges traditional and modern, and the couple's mutual desire to balance comfort with the bare necessities, living lightly on the land while fully engaging with their surroundings. Photo by Shai Gil.
  Photo by Shai Gil.

    The 1,500-square-foot cabin merges traditional and modern, and the couple's mutual desire to balance comfort with the bare necessities, living lightly on the land while fully engaging with their surroundings. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.
  • 
  Bunk beds keep the sleeping arrangements flexible and low-key, like any good cabin should. Photo by Shai Gil.
  Photo by Shai Gil.

    Bunk beds keep the sleeping arrangements flexible and low-key, like any good cabin should. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.
  • 
  Walls and ceilings fold like origami, sheltering the interior with tent-like flaps. On the enclosed porch, horizontal slats, a modern hallmark often seen in the pages of Dwell, is palatable for a traditionalist thanks to generous use of cedar. Photo by Shai Gil.
  Photo by Shai Gil.

    Walls and ceilings fold like origami, sheltering the interior with tent-like flaps. On the enclosed porch, horizontal slats, a modern hallmark often seen in the pages of Dwell, is palatable for a traditionalist thanks to generous use of cedar. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.
  • 
  As the untreated cedar boards and shakes weather and bleach out over time, the cottage will blend further into its landscape. Photo by Shai Gil.
  Photo by Shai Gil.

    As the untreated cedar boards and shakes weather and bleach out over time, the cottage will blend further into its landscape. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.
  • 
  superrkül dubbed this project the Stealth Cabin because it's hidden in the landscape and will continue to recede in view over time. Photo by Shai Gil.
  Photo by Shai Gil.

    superrkül dubbed this project the Stealth Cabin because it's hidden in the landscape and will continue to recede in view over time. Photo by Shai Gil.

    Photo by Shai Gil.

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