Split the Difference

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photos by:
February 22, 2012
Originally published in Less Is Modern
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  A series of levels gives the house a sense of separation between the main rooms.
    A series of levels gives the house a sense of separation between the main rooms.
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  The architect designed the kitchen cabinetry, and used wood left over from the demo of the house’s exterior wall for the dining table. A piece by Nicolas Grenier hangs above a cabinet the residents found at a garage sale.
    The architect designed the kitchen cabinetry, and used wood left over from the demo of the house’s exterior wall for the dining table. A piece by Nicolas Grenier hangs above a cabinet the residents found at a garage sale.
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  Nicolas Gervais designed the pendant lights above the kitchen island, which was designed by Plasse and built by woodworker Stéphane Bilodeau.
    Nicolas Gervais designed the pendant lights above the kitchen island, which was designed by Plasse and built by woodworker Stéphane Bilodeau.
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  Tiles from Ramacieri-Soligo brighten the bathroom, off the hall.
    Tiles from Ramacieri-Soligo brighten the bathroom, off the hall.
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  The kitchen overlooks the sunken living room, beneath the master bedroom.
    The kitchen overlooks the sunken living room, beneath the master bedroom.
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  Raymond takes a break on the master bedroom’s interior balcony, which is cantilevered over the dining area.
    Raymond takes a break on the master bedroom’s interior balcony, which is cantilevered over the dining area.
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  Near the entrance is the front room, or music room, their daughter’s current favorite play area. “Every space needed to be used efficiently,” Parisien notes of the home’s remodel.
    Near the entrance is the front room, or music room, their daughter’s current favorite play area. “Every space needed to be used efficiently,” Parisien notes of the home’s remodel.
  • 
  As shown on the model, the architect traded the brick on the rear facade for steel, wood, and an Alumilex door leading to the family’s new backyard; he retained the brick at the entrance.
    As shown on the model, the architect traded the brick on the rear facade for steel, wood, and an Alumilex door leading to the family’s new backyard; he retained the brick at the entrance.
  • 
  “Three things were clear when we started working with the architect: One, we had a limited budget; two, we had to plan for a kid; and three, every space had to be planned for—we didn’t want extra space we didn’t need.”—Francis Parisien
    “Three things were clear when we started working with the architect: One, we had a limited budget; two, we had to plan for a kid; and three, every space had to be planned for—we didn’t want extra space we didn’t need.”—Francis Parisien
  • 
  The entrance.Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
    The entrance.

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

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