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Space-Saving Wood-Paneled Apartment in Manhattan

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Faced with the challenge of a diminutive New York apartment in desperate need of a refresh, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior.

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  Visiting a Manahttan apartment designed by Tim Seggerman is like sitting inside one of Nakashima’s cabinets, a metaphor realized most fully in an ingenious “library”—really just a glorified cubby with a banded maple ceiling, conjured from a free space adjacent to the loft bed.  Photo by: David Engelhardt

    Visiting a Manahttan apartment designed by Tim Seggerman is like sitting inside one of Nakashima’s cabinets, a metaphor realized most fully in an ingenious “library”—really just a glorified cubby with a banded maple ceiling, conjured from a free space adjacent to the loft bed.

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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  Wood WorksFaced with the challenge of a diminutive New York apartment in desperate need of a refresh, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior, featured in our November Small Spaces issue.  Photo by: David Engelhardt
    Wood Works

    Faced with the challenge of a diminutive New York apartment in desperate need of a refresh, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior, featured in our November Small Spaces issue.

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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    Photo by: David Engelhardt

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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  Faced with the challenge of a diminutive New York apartment in desperate need of a refresh, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior. Photo by David Engelhardt.  Photo by: David Engelhardt

    Faced with the challenge of a diminutive New York apartment in desperate need of a refresh, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior. Photo by David Engelhardt.

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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    Photo by: David Engelhardt

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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  In this truly tiny apartment, a 240-square-foot shoebox of an apartment in NYC with a sleeping loft over the kitchen, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior. Photo by David Engelhardt.   Photo by: David Engelhardt

    In this truly tiny apartment, a 240-square-foot shoebox of an apartment in NYC with a sleeping loft over the kitchen, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior. Photo by David Engelhardt. 

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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  Inspired by mid-century furniture designer George Nakashima, Seggerman crafted the components by hand in his home studio. The cabinetry in the kitchen and shelving in the bedroom seamlessly flow, adding the impression that there is more space. Photo by David Engelhardt.  Photo by: David Engelhardt

    Inspired by mid-century furniture designer George Nakashima, Seggerman crafted the components by hand in his home studio. The cabinetry in the kitchen and shelving in the bedroom seamlessly flow, adding the impression that there is more space. Photo by David Engelhardt.

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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  Faced with the challenge of a 240-square-foot New York apartment in desperate need of a refresh, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior. The architect brightens the limited space with warm wood and tiny tile. Photo by David Engelhardt.   Photo by: David Engelhardt

    Faced with the challenge of a 240-square-foot New York apartment in desperate need of a refresh, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior. The architect brightens the limited space with warm wood and tiny tile. Photo by David Engelhardt. 

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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