On a Rock in a Hard Place

written by:
photos by:
May 1, 2009

In an unlikely mountaintop locale, Anderson Anderson Architecture crafted a home out of a complex composition of off-the-shelf components, paving new paths for the prefabricated construction industry.

Read Full Article
  • 
  Looking like a jewel box at dusk, Scott Stafne’s Cantilever House rests easy in the middle of the Washington woods. With miles of hiking trails, lakes, and waterfalls to explore, Stafne’s property provides almost unlimited opportunity for outdoor adventures. The strong and sturdy house acts as a warm respite from the elements when the weather won’t cooperate, which is often—horizontal rain and whipping winds can be the norm.  Photo by: John Clark
    Looking like a jewel box at dusk, Scott Stafne’s Cantilever House rests easy in the middle of the Washington woods. With miles of hiking trails, lakes, and waterfalls to explore, Stafne’s property provides almost unlimited opportunity for outdoor adventures. The strong and sturdy house acts as a warm respite from the elements when the weather won’t cooperate, which is often—horizontal rain and whipping winds can be the norm.

    Photo by: John Clark

  • 
  The design of the Cantilever House, as it's known, is based on a 14-by-86-by-22-foot steel frame resting on a 14-by-31-foot concrete foundation bolted to an existing rock.  Photo by: John Clark
    The design of the Cantilever House, as it's known, is based on a 14-by-86-by-22-foot steel frame resting on a 14-by-31-foot concrete foundation bolted to an existing rock.

    Photo by: John Clark

  • 
  The use of structural insulated panels (SIPs) throughout the house helped speed the construction process. Peter Anderson explains, "The panels themselves hang from and rest upon the steel frame and wood spline beam system, which is the link between the steel frame and the panels. The SIPs provide enclosure, insulation, and the spanning capacity to support the cast-concrete floor."  Photo by: John Clark
    The use of structural insulated panels (SIPs) throughout the house helped speed the construction process. Peter Anderson explains, "The panels themselves hang from and rest upon the steel frame and wood spline beam system, which is the link between the steel frame and the panels. The SIPs provide enclosure, insulation, and the spanning capacity to support the cast-concrete floor."

    Photo by: John Clark

  • 
  Architect Peter Anderson explains that “the floating nature of the design would not have been possible with conventional onsite framing techniques, nor any of the currently marketed modular home designs.” Using a heavy structural steel frame, engineered wood spline beam system, and structural insulated panels, the architects created a truly unique hybrid structural system and, in the end, a home.  Photo by: John Clark
    Architect Peter Anderson explains that “the floating nature of the design would not have been possible with conventional onsite framing techniques, nor any of the currently marketed modular home designs.” Using a heavy structural steel frame, engineered wood spline beam system, and structural insulated panels, the architects created a truly unique hybrid structural system and, in the end, a home.

    Photo by: John Clark

  • 
  The living room looks out toward the two waterfalls that are also part of the property and the inspiration for its name. Artist Constantin Hapaianu made the coffee table and the stainless steel railings surrounding the staircase.  Photo by: John Clark
    The living room looks out toward the two waterfalls that are also part of the property and the inspiration for its name. Artist Constantin Hapaianu made the coffee table and the stainless steel railings surrounding the staircase.

    Photo by: John Clark

  • 
  Scott Stafne relaxes in his upstairs office/TV room in his Natuzzi lounge chair.  Photo by: John Clark
    Scott Stafne relaxes in his upstairs office/TV room in his Natuzzi lounge chair.

    Photo by: John Clark

  • 
  The stairs and the wood paneling were designed and built by wood-worker Noah Israel, a longtime neighbor and friend.  Photo by: John Clark
    The stairs and the wood paneling were designed and built by wood-worker Noah Israel, a longtime neighbor and friend.

    Photo by: John Clark

  • 
  Stafne’s office showcases his ingenious use of the steel structure of the house as a handy bookcase.  Photo by: John Clark
    Stafne’s office showcases his ingenious use of the steel structure of the house as a handy bookcase.

    Photo by: John Clark

  • 
  The master bath features a tiled shower—an optimal spot for viewing the intense weather.  Photo by: John Clark
    The master bath features a tiled shower—an optimal spot for viewing the intense weather.

    Photo by: John Clark

  • 
  Mimicking the cantilever of the house, an outdoor shower just off the master bedroom stretches out gently toward the surrounding woods.  Photo by: John Clark
    Mimicking the cantilever of the house, an outdoor shower just off the master bedroom stretches out gently toward the surrounding woods.

    Photo by: John Clark

@current / @total

Read Full Article

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...