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Polished Minimalism: A Modern Abode in Atlanta

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Designer Barbara Hill applies her polished take on minimalism to a traditional 1920s abode in Atlanta for a transplanted Houston family.

  • 
  The home’s informal dining space has a slightly rustic feel, sporting bronze  and wood in the form of  a Lindsey Adams Adelman chandelier for Roll & Hill and a table 
by Terry Dwan, mixed with folk-art touches like the Eames House Birds and a cuckoo clock from Diamantini & Domeniconi. The PK8 
chairs from Republic of 
Fritz Hansen were designed by Poul Kjærlholm and 
sourced from Kuhl-Linscomb 
in Houston, Texas.  Photo by Gregory Miller.
    The home’s informal dining space has a slightly rustic feel, sporting bronze and wood in the form of a Lindsey Adams Adelman chandelier for Roll & Hill and a table by Terry Dwan, mixed with folk-art touches like the Eames House Birds and a cuckoo clock from Diamantini & Domeniconi. The PK8 chairs from Republic of Fritz Hansen were designed by Poul Kjærlholm and sourced from Kuhl-Linscomb in Houston, Texas. Photo by Gregory Miller.
  • 
  Konstantin Grcic’s Venus chairs for ClassiCon surround a table by Poliform in the formal dining room. Hill selected the Flos chandelier designed by Marcel Wanders for its “Old World reverence.” The sleek fireplace mantel was designed by Hill and cobbled together onsite from three solid slabs of limestone.  Photo by Gregory Miller.
    Konstantin Grcic’s Venus chairs for ClassiCon surround a table by Poliform in the formal dining room. Hill selected the Flos chandelier designed by Marcel Wanders for its “Old World reverence.” The sleek fireplace mantel was designed by Hill and cobbled together onsite from three solid slabs of limestone. Photo by Gregory Miller.
  • 
  The family’s 1920s Mediterranean-style manse is an eclectic example of the architecture found in Atlanta’s elegant Buckhead neighborhood.  Photo by Gregory Miller.
    The family’s 1920s Mediterranean-style manse is an eclectic example of the architecture found in Atlanta’s elegant Buckhead neighborhood. Photo by Gregory Miller.
  • 
  Two pieces from E15’s Shiraz sofa flank 
the company’s wooden Leila side tables. 
Hill chose to use flat paint in Benjamin Moore’s Decorators White throughout the home 
because it emphasizes the chalkiness of the plaster walls, making them “look almost like slate.” The sconce shown in the foreground—David Chipperfield’s Corrubedo design for 
FontanaArte—gives off a soft glow and 
replaces the dozens of paper-lampshade 
wall fixtures the owners found in the house when they bought it. Stewart Cohen’s 
zany photograph of a gun-toting Marfa 
resident encapsulates Barbara Hill’s offbeat brand of decorating: bright and minimal, 
yet darkly humorous.  Photo by Gregory Miller.
    Two pieces from E15’s Shiraz sofa flank the company’s wooden Leila side tables. Hill chose to use flat paint in Benjamin Moore’s Decorators White throughout the home because it emphasizes the chalkiness of the plaster walls, making them “look almost like slate.” The sconce shown in the foreground—David Chipperfield’s Corrubedo design for FontanaArte—gives off a soft glow and replaces the dozens of paper-lampshade wall fixtures the owners found in the house when they bought it. Stewart Cohen’s zany photograph of a gun-toting Marfa resident encapsulates Barbara Hill’s offbeat brand of decorating: bright and minimal, yet darkly humorous. Photo by Gregory Miller.
  • 
  The gold (nonfunctioning) surveillance camera by artist Camp Bosworth in the stairwell previously hung in the glass entryway of the family’s former house in Houston.  Photo by Gregory Miller.
    The gold (nonfunctioning) surveillance camera by artist Camp Bosworth in the stairwell previously hung in the glass entryway of the family’s former house in Houston. Photo by Gregory Miller.
  • 
  To highlight the existing architecture of the home, Hill 
retained the dark polish of 
the casement windows, which 
she finds enhances period details instead of undermining 
them. In the rear sunroom, the vintage Case Study furniture pieces with Plexiglas bases are from Metro Retro 
in Houston. 

A Bourgie lamp by Kartell is 
atop an old marble end table by Knoll, and the Gan kilim rug pictures a branch motif echoed in the kitchen and breakfast room.  Photo by Gregory Miller.
    To highlight the existing architecture of the home, Hill retained the dark polish of the casement windows, which she finds enhances period details instead of undermining them. In the rear sunroom, the vintage Case Study furniture pieces with Plexiglas bases are from Metro Retro in Houston. A Bourgie lamp by Kartell is atop an old marble end table by Knoll, and the Gan kilim rug pictures a branch motif echoed in the kitchen and breakfast room. Photo by Gregory Miller.
  • 
  Vitra’s Slow chair sits in front of a powder-coated-steel bookcase made by Hill’s go-to fabricator, George Sacaris; it was originally built for the Houston house.  Photo by Gregory Miller.
    Vitra’s Slow chair sits in front of a powder-coated-steel bookcase made by Hill’s go-to fabricator, George Sacaris; it was originally built for the Houston house. Photo by Gregory Miller.
  • 
  Intended for a much bigger room in the family’s previous home, the bed was designed by Hill and is covered in Maharam fabric in a doily print called Intricate 001 Charcoal. The side tables 
are from West Elm, and the AJ table lamp is by Arne Jacobsen for Louis Poulsen.  Photo by Gregory Miller.
    Intended for a much bigger room in the family’s previous home, the bed was designed by Hill and is covered in Maharam fabric in a doily print called Intricate 001 Charcoal. The side tables are from West Elm, and the AJ table lamp is by Arne Jacobsen for Louis Poulsen. Photo by Gregory Miller.
  • 
  Hill had the overhead lighting in the kitchen customized by Rich Brilliant Willing in a pert orange that accents the primarily black-and-white interior scheme. She added a stainless steel kitchen island by Bulthaup, its glossiness and “clean feel” tempered by the plastic stacking stools designed by Konstantin Grcic for Magis. The cabinets, 
appliances, countertops, and marble tile were kept as-is, with the addition of several coats of white paint in order to blend seamlessly with the walls.  Photo by Gregory Miller.
    Hill had the overhead lighting in the kitchen customized by Rich Brilliant Willing in a pert orange that accents the primarily black-and-white interior scheme. She added a stainless steel kitchen island by Bulthaup, its glossiness and “clean feel” tempered by the plastic stacking stools designed by Konstantin Grcic for Magis. The cabinets, appliances, countertops, and marble tile were kept as-is, with the addition of several coats of white paint in order to blend seamlessly with the walls. Photo by Gregory Miller.

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