Palace Intrigue

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January 16, 2009
In the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius, architect Rytis Mikulionis spent several years property hunting for his first nesting ground and finally ended up inside a former Soviet army barrack, which was, before that, a building on the grounds of a Baroque palace. The city’s astounding collage of architectural histories, compounded with a stimulating encounter between eastern and western aesthetics, make for a unique visiting experience. Read Full Article
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  The renovated façade of Mikulionis’s flat, seen beyond thin snow and bare trees from the grounds of the monastery.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    The renovated façade of Mikulionis’s flat, seen beyond thin snow and bare trees from the grounds of the monastery.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  Sconces hang in front of the living room niche. The furnishings of the architect’s design are fully stocked with pillows made from exotic patterned fabrics.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    Sconces hang in front of the living room niche. The furnishings of the architect’s design are fully stocked with pillows made from exotic patterned fabrics.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  Moby the cat sits on the windowsill, which the architect constructed by cutting a geometric pattern into a thick sheet of MDF, a fiberboard product that’s inexpensive, easy to machine, and unrecognizable when coated in white lacquer paint.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    Moby the cat sits on the windowsill, which the architect constructed by cutting a geometric pattern into a thick sheet of MDF, a fiberboard product that’s inexpensive, easy to machine, and unrecognizable when coated in white lacquer paint.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  In the bathroom, which is tucked under the mezzanine, the toilet-bidet set from Pozzi Ginori boasts rounded rectangles with pleasingly deep but minimal basins. The wall sconces are from the Spanish lighting company Vibia, and fit neatly between brick-like rectangular tiles.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    In the bathroom, which is tucked under the mezzanine, the toilet-bidet set from Pozzi Ginori boasts rounded rectangles with pleasingly deep but minimal basins. The wall sconces are from the Spanish lighting company Vibia, and fit neatly between brick-like rectangular tiles.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  A couple items of antique furniture from Mikulionis’s family add to the flat’s feeling of history. A painting by Augustinas Liatukas, subject unknown, hangs at the entrance to the mezzanine bedroom above a custom lightbox featuring the ubiquitous CNC-cut geometric pattern.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    A couple items of antique furniture from Mikulionis’s family add to the flat’s feeling of history. A painting by Augustinas Liatukas, subject unknown, hangs at the entrance to the mezzanine bedroom above a custom lightbox featuring the ubiquitous CNC-cut geometric pattern.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  Mikulionis custom designed the white steel staircase that leads from the living area up to the bedroom platform.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    Mikulionis custom designed the white steel staircase that leads from the living area up to the bedroom platform.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  Delicate detail punctuates the ceiling, which was once covered in Soviet army signatures.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    Delicate detail punctuates the ceiling, which was once covered in Soviet army signatures.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  The bed, on the mezzanine, has a B.Lux “Nite” light at its side. The drapes, from Designers Guild, hide the wall closet.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    The bed, on the mezzanine, has a B.Lux “Nite” light at its side. The drapes, from Designers Guild, hide the wall closet.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  The platform bed was designed by the architect. The pattern on the ceiling was drawn by Rasa Baradinskiene, a local designer, in colored pencil over the off-white paint. Mikulionis and Marcinkeviciute don’t worry about slipping through the rails to the living room level below.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    The platform bed was designed by the architect. The pattern on the ceiling was drawn by Rasa Baradinskiene, a local designer, in colored pencil over the off-white paint. Mikulionis and Marcinkeviciute don’t worry about slipping through the rails to the living room level below.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  The kitchen fits neatly on one wall. The architect reads at a black Ligne Roset dining set, beneath a Col pendant lamp by Francisco Luján. The tublar steel mezzanine rails were designed by Mikulionis, who enjoyed being exempt from the safety concerns that a client would force on him.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    The kitchen fits neatly on one wall. The architect reads at a black Ligne Roset dining set, beneath a Col pendant lamp by Francisco Luján. The tublar steel mezzanine rails were designed by Mikulionis, who enjoyed being exempt from the safety concerns that a client would force on him.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  The wood stove roars atop a table designed by the architect.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    The wood stove roars atop a table designed by the architect.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  The architect looks toward the grounds of an 18th-century monastery, which accompanies the domed church. The large hi-fi system with Infinity acoustics is three centuries newer than the building behind it. The wall sconces are from Luzifer Lamps in Spain. Their pattern of triangular prisms is reminiscent of ceilings in the domes of the Alhambra, the ancient Moorish palace in Andalucia. The shelves are stocked with souvenirs from Mikulionis’s travels—throughout both Europe and former Soviet states like Uzbekistan and Ukraine.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    The architect looks toward the grounds of an 18th-century monastery, which accompanies the domed church. The large hi-fi system with Infinity acoustics is three centuries newer than the building behind it. The wall sconces are from Luzifer Lamps in Spain. Their pattern of triangular prisms is reminiscent of ceilings in the domes of the Alhambra, the ancient Moorish palace in Andalucia. The shelves are stocked with souvenirs from Mikulionis’s travels—throughout both Europe and former Soviet states like Uzbekistan and Ukraine.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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  Rytis Mikulionis relaxes on a sectional sofa of his design, below a monumental Bul reading lamp by Ligne Roset. He gazes at the winter haze streaming through a grand picture window, the flat’s only source of natural light.  Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus
    Rytis Mikulionis relaxes on a sectional sofa of his design, below a monumental Bul reading lamp by Ligne Roset. He gazes at the winter haze streaming through a grand picture window, the flat’s only source of natural light.

    Photo by: Hertha Hurnaus

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