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Nice Box

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In October, the light in Norway is cold and diffused by rain. It's "our worst month," says John Roger Holte, a Norwegian artist and builder. The weather may be dismal here, but the Boxhome, which Holte helped build, gleams with optimism and modernity.

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  The project's lead architect, Sami Rintala says the Boxhome reflects how we're supposed to live: "with few possessions and a small space around us."  Photo by Pia Ulin.
    The project's lead architect, Sami Rintala says the Boxhome reflects how we're supposed to live: "with few possessions and a small space around us." Photo by Pia Ulin.
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  The kitchen table, built into the structure of the house, includes two hot plates. Rintala says these were inspired by the Korean way of cooking: Residents and guests will cook their own food at the table.  Photo by Pia Ulin.
    The kitchen table, built into the structure of the house, includes two hot plates. Rintala says these were inspired by the Korean way of cooking: Residents and guests will cook their own food at the table. Photo by Pia Ulin.
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  A pair of hot plates await dishes in the dining nook.  Photo by Pia Ulin.
    A pair of hot plates await dishes in the dining nook. Photo by Pia Ulin.
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  Inside the Boxhome, colors are muted, light remains local, and the dark-stained woods stand out against lighter grains. When residents and guests gather, the Boxhome's kitchen takes on a new role, bringing everyone to the table to talk.  Photo by Pia Ulin.
    Inside the Boxhome, colors are muted, light remains local, and the dark-stained woods stand out against lighter grains. When residents and guests gather, the Boxhome's kitchen takes on a new role, bringing everyone to the table to talk. Photo by Pia Ulin.
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  From the sitting room you can see into the bedroom, with its strip of window in the ceiling. From the kitchen table you have a view of the bathroom and the lofted living space above. "You can see the stairs from your bed," Rintala says.  Photo by Pia Ulin.
    From the sitting room you can see into the bedroom, with its strip of window in the ceiling. From the kitchen table you have a view of the bathroom and the lofted living space above. "You can see the stairs from your bed," Rintala says. Photo by Pia Ulin.

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