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The New Suburbanism

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When an urban expat couple decided to build the suburban house they wanted rather than the one their neighbors expected, they ended up with a spare but airy jewel box and no wooden shingles.

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  Turning its back to the street and next-door apartment like a curled-up cat, the long, narrow house spills out sideways to the garden, designed by landscape architect Andrea Cochran.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    Turning its back to the street and next-door apartment like a curled-up cat, the long, narrow house spills out sideways to the garden, designed by landscape architect Andrea Cochran.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  A series of stepping stones leads from the private garden room behind the master bedroom into the open yard.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    A series of stepping stones leads from the private garden room behind the master bedroom into the open yard.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  May Lawrence sits at the dining table, which features mahogany planks attached to an actual I beam. Above her sprawls a Rigo 99 painting of a bustling Taipei street scene, which according to Ward helps import some "city energy" into the suburbs.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    May Lawrence sits at the dining table, which features mahogany planks attached to an actual I beam. Above her sprawls a Rigo 99 painting of a bustling Taipei street scene, which according to Ward helps import some "city energy" into the suburbs.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  Charles de Lisle, of the interior design firm Your Space, designed the kitchen backsplash of PVC rubber flooring embedded with stainless steel "plus" signs. The restaurant supply table is flanked by steel-and-wood Lem Piston stools from Design Within Reach.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    Charles de Lisle, of the interior design firm Your Space, designed the kitchen backsplash of PVC rubber flooring embedded with stainless steel "plus" signs. The restaurant supply table is flanked by steel-and-wood Lem Piston stools from Design Within Reach.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  David Baker and cabinetmaker Thomas Jameson designed the freestanding fireplace / media console, which effectively divides the more formal living room from the dining and gathering space while concealing cords and other clutter.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    David Baker and cabinetmaker Thomas Jameson designed the freestanding fireplace / media console, which effectively divides the more formal living room from the dining and gathering space while concealing cords and other clutter.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  "The structure is simple and straightforward, with nothing hidden," says Baker, "but I made all of the beams and columns as thin and understated as possible, inside and out, so the feeling is delicate rather than monolithic."  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    "The structure is simple and straightforward, with nothing hidden," says Baker, "but I made all of the beams and columns as thin and understated as possible, inside and out, so the feeling is delicate rather than monolithic."

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  May Lawrence sits beside one of three ground-level "snow-viewing" windows for which Cochran designed meditative water installations. This one depicts ice mountains (made from recycled glass) that take on an otherworldly glow when lit up at night.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    May Lawrence sits beside one of three ground-level "snow-viewing" windows for which Cochran designed meditative water installations. This one depicts ice mountains (made from recycled glass) that take on an otherworldly glow when lit up at night.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  The glass platform bed is backed by a headboard of two sheets of lucite embedded with aquamarine wool from Maharam. Hanging pillow-side, electroluminescent draperies glow in the dark.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    The glass platform bed is backed by a headboard of two sheets of lucite embedded with aquamarine wool from Maharam. Hanging pillow-side, electroluminescent draperies glow in the dark.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  The house moves in linear fashion towards increasingly private zones—upstairs to the family room and down the hall to the master bedroom, where an open door reveals a secluded garden room at the very back.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    The house moves in linear fashion towards increasingly private zones—upstairs to the family room and down the hall to the master bedroom, where an open door reveals a secluded garden room at the very back.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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  Scott Ward and Snowflake share a moment in the sun on their built-in mahogany perch.  Photo by: Robert Schlatter
    Scott Ward and Snowflake share a moment in the sun on their built-in mahogany perch.

    Photo by: Robert Schlatter

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