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New Orleans, LA

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As New Orleans struggles to get back on its feet, one architect learns from the past while building for the future.
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  Bild Design introduced the new structure seamlessly with the help of builders A.J. Christiana Construction. Ms. Doris, whose tarp-clad house to the left lost much of its roof when Hurricane Katrina struck, checks out her new neighbor.  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    Bild Design introduced the new structure seamlessly with the help of builders A.J. Christiana Construction. Ms. Doris, whose tarp-clad house to the left lost much of its roof when Hurricane Katrina struck, checks out her new neighbor.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  Julie Charvat of Bild Design exits the Lowerline House. Raised three feet off the ground—rather than slab on grade—the house is well equipped to battle any incoming flood waters.  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    Julie Charvat of Bild Design exits the Lowerline House. Raised three feet off the ground—rather than slab on grade—the house is well equipped to battle any incoming flood waters.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  The dining area of the two-bedroom unit, which occupies the top two loors of the structure.  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    The dining area of the two-bedroom unit, which occupies the top two loors of the structure.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  The ground-floor studio is fully equipped with IKEA everything.  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    The ground-floor studio is fully equipped with IKEA everything.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  Jeremy Claud ascends to his bed, which is on a raised platform that hovers over a staircase.  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    Jeremy Claud ascends to his bed, which is on a raised platform that hovers over a staircase.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  The bed is perched above the staircase leading from the second-story living area to 
the third-story sleeping area.  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    The bed is perched above the staircase leading from the second-story living area to the third-story sleeping area.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  Julie Charvat (with Byron Mouton) says, “Byron wanted us to move here ourselves for the views, but I said, ‘We just moved a few years ago so forget it.’”  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    Julie Charvat (with Byron Mouton) says, “Byron wanted us to move here ourselves for the views, but I said, ‘We just moved a few years ago so forget it.’”

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  Though the Lowerline House may appear radically different, it deliberately mimics the neighboring shotgun camel-backs. The form is derived from a time when city taxes were based on the height of a building at the street front. To get more space but not get taxed, houses were built up on the rear of the property, problem solved.  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    Though the Lowerline House may appear radically different, it deliberately mimics the neighboring shotgun camel-backs. The form is derived from a time when city taxes were based on the height of a building at the street front. To get more space but not get taxed, houses were built up on the rear of the property, problem solved.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  Ms. Doris offers Jeremy Claud some neighborly advice.  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    Ms. Doris offers Jeremy Claud some neighborly advice.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  Resident Tony Vanky gets the second-story deck prepared for guests. The grittiness of the Black Pearl neighborhood is plainly visible.  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    Resident Tony Vanky gets the second-story deck prepared for guests. The grittiness of the Black Pearl neighborhood is plainly visible.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  When Bild began work on the Lowerline House, a beautiful green baseball field sat across the street. Within two weeks after Katrina struck, the baseball field was transformed into a FEMA trailer neighborhood housing many displaced Tulane workers. “I think it is really prophetic,” Mouton says. “As soon as we put up this steel-clad thing, all these other steel-clad things migrated here too.”  Photo by: Catherine Ledner
    When Bild began work on the Lowerline House, a beautiful green baseball field sat across the street. Within two weeks after Katrina struck, the baseball field was transformed into a FEMA trailer neighborhood housing many displaced Tulane workers. “I think it is really prophetic,” Mouton says. “As soon as we put up this steel-clad thing, all these other steel-clad things migrated here too.”

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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